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Friday, March 16, 2018

Music That's Right For Recovery

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Music is an integral part of most people’s lives; without it, existence would be exceedingly dull. We all have bands, singers, and songwriters whose arts speaks to us in ways that are hard to describe. Few words can accurately convey how a song makes you feel inside; excited, amped, relaxed, and alive are a few that might come to mind. Music can be your best friend when you are having a hard time in life; if you are struggling through a situation, then putting an album on can give you perspective or give you a brief respite from your woes. Simply put, instruments in harmony can be quite cathartic; which means that people in recovery can significantly benefit from listening to some tunes.

While it is true that the right melody and lyrics can bring you back to earth or help you carry on in times of mental strife, there is an excellent chance that certain songs or bands are inextricably linked to your past substance use. Everyone working a program of recovery can probably think of a song that, if they were to hear it, would bring back memories of getting drunk or high. Naturally, such associations between music and using drugs is problematic for people in early recovery. One must do everything in their power to limit exposure to anything that might trigger a desire to use.

That’s not to say that you have to turn your back on all your favorite bands just because you used to listen to them under the influence. But, given that hearing a song may only remind you of the fun you had in active addiction, rather than the heartache, you can benefit from steering clear of particular artists or types of music when recovery is in its infancy. It's possible that you were taught this in treatment when the facility confiscated you iPod.

 

Is This Beneficial to My Recovery?


In life, triggers can arise from just about anywhere and from anything. Those dedicated to working a program of addiction recovery must take steps to avoid specific people, places, and things. If you are unable to cut ties with particular individuals or stay out of wet areas, you will find it challenging to keep on track. Remember, there is only one thing we need to change in recovery, everything!

If you recently completed an addiction treatment program and find yourself back in the real world diligently avoiding the trappings of drugs and alcohol, it might be time to reconsider your record collection for the foreseeable future. At least until your program of recovery is strong enough to rebel against any urges to use that might stem from listening to music. Naturally, you don’t have to cut music out for your life completely, just exercise caution when it comes to your playlist.

Recovery is a journey toward progress. We adopt specific practices and foster behaviors and traditions that will give us the power to abstain from drugs and alcohol for the rest of our lives. If you know that certain types of music or a given artist is deeply associated with your past, then it is easy enough to stay away. Perhaps you might broaden your musical horizons by giving something new a chance. There are plenty of artists who are in recovery themselves who write songs that speak to others in the program. Ask your peers what they listen to these days, you can make this task a bit of an adventure. Who knows what you might discover along the way?

 

Addiction Recovery


Have drugs and alcohol negatively impacted your life and well-being? At Celebrate Hope we can assist you in laying a foundation for lasting recovery. Please contact us today to begin the journey.

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