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Friday, July 12, 2019

Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Alcohol Use

alcohol use
Alcohol is legal for adults over the age of 21 to use, even though it is responsible for more than 88,000 deaths per year. The toll the substance takes on families and society is enormous. Still, most people look fondly upon an opportunity to drink at the end of a long day or week.

Less than 100,000 alcohol-related deaths may not seem like much in the grand scheme of things. However, more people succumb to illnesses linked to alcoholism than that of opioids. Globally, 3 million lives are lost due to hazardous alcohol, the World Health Organization (WHO) reports. It is a staggering number, and the exact figure is substantially higher in all likelihood.

While most developed nations have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol, finding solutions to the problem is not simple. The legal status of drinking makes it challenging to tackle alcohol-related issues like addiction. Most states, counties, and cities lack the resources to assist everyone who drinks hazardously.

Addiction treatment and recovery services are wanting in many parts of the United States. The same is valid internationally. The WHO believes that they can offer some guidance in addressing the harmful use of alcohol. The organization has developed a global strategy to help nations reduce morbidity and mortality due to alcohol use.

How to Address the Social Consequences of Alcohol Use


“The WHO global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol seeks to improve the health and social outcomes for individuals, families and communities, with considerably reduced morbidity and mortality due to harmful use of alcohol and their ensuing social consequences. It is envisaged that the global strategy will promote and support local, regional and global actions to prevent and reduce the harmful use of alcohol.”

The organization focuses on ten specific areas of policy options and interventions at the national level. They include:
  1. Leadership, awareness and commitment
  2. Health services' response.
  3. Community action.
  4. Drink-driving policies and countermeasures.
  5. Availability of alcohol.
  6. Marketing of alcoholic beverages.
  7. Pricing policies.
  8. Reducing the negative consequences of drinking and alcohol intoxication.
  9. Reducing the public health impact of illicit alcohol and informally produced alcohol.
  10. Monitoring and surveillance.
At the heart of the organization’s plan is raising awareness and putting an end to stigmatization. They encourage nations to implement policies that will increase access to alcohol use disorder screenings and treatment services. Developing strategies that prevent easy access to alcohol by vulnerable and high-risk groups is also essential.

Countries that increase alcohol prices can reduce underage drinking and episodes of heavy use, according to the strategy. Moreover, it is vital that each new policy is monitored to determine which initiatives are successful.

If you would like to read more about the WHO global strategy on alcohol, please click here.

Faith-Based Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, we specialize in the treatment of alcohol use disorder; our team relies on a combination of faith-based principles and evidence-based modalities. Those who are able to adopt certain practices can turn their lives around completely.

Please contact us today to learn more about our compassionate, faith-based addiction programs and services.

Friday, June 28, 2019

Exercise in Recovery is Beneficial

exercise in recovery
People in recovery who emphasize the importance of not just mental health, but physical health too, benefit significantly. The mind and body support one another in multiple ways; neglecting one side of the system impacts the other.

Evidence-based addiction treatment programs encourage clients to focus on eating healthy and exercising as a means of promoting healing. People with a history of drug and alcohol misuse are typically out of shape and malnourished. They may also have physical health problems associated with their addiction.

Taking steps to bolster physical wellbeing will help the body heal from the damage done and make people feel better. Moreover, physical fitness can benefit the mind in several ways; even light workouts release endorphins: a type of hormone produced by the nervous system. Endorphins are beneficial because they help men and women cope with pain or stress.

Individuals in early recovery are susceptible to high levels of stress in addition to physical and emotional pain. Anything that can be done to mitigate discomfort healthily promotes healing. Exercise can also serve as a distraction from the triggers and cravings that can lead to relapse.

Incorporating Exercise Into Your Recovery Routine


One of the first things that people who are new to recovery learn about is finding balance. A common pitfall among men and women in early sobriety is going full-steam-ahead into everything. As such, things that should be healthy can become counterproductive.

Introducing exercise to one’s life should take place at a moderate pace. Personal limitations must also be considered to avoid injuries. Diving head first with all a person has into working out can lead to problems. What starts as a healthy distraction can end up distracting a person from the needs of their program.

Those looking to prioritize their physical health do well to talk first with doctors, therapists, and support networks. If the goal is to feel better and to be able to handle stress without resorting to drugs and alcohol, asking for guidance on physical fitness in recovery is wise.

Naturally, men and women with limitations must look for low-impact activities. Short walks and swimming are examples of low-impact aerobic exercises. People with pre-existing physical health conditions should seek out exercise routines that will cater to their constraints.

Working out with a peer in recovery can help strengthen personal connections. Isolation isn’t recommended in early sobriety; finding someone who shares similar goals is doubly beneficial. There are also some physical fitness organizations bringing together men and women in recovery.

The Phoenix is a nonprofit organization operating in several states that offers anyone with at least 48 hours of sobriety the chance to engage with a community committed to staying active. The organization provides addicts and alcoholics an opportunity to participate in peer-led boxing, CrossFit, hiking, rock climbing, and running events.

California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Celebrate Hope assists adult men and women who are struggling with addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. Please contact us today to learn more about our faith-based addiction rehab center and the programs we offer.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Drugs, Alcohol, Suicide, and Millennials

overdose
Good news! New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests deaths from drug overdoses decreased slightly between 2017 and 2018. After two decades of steadily rising overdose death rates, a little headway has been made. There were 21.7 deaths per 100,000, compared to 20.8 deaths per 100,000 for the 12 months ending in the second quarter of 2018.

Efforts to increase access to addiction treatment services and the overdose reversal drug naloxone has paid off, some. However, the public health crisis this country faces is still as real as ever. As many as six million people could be living with an opioid use disorder involving the use of prescription painkillers or heroin.

Each day, more than 100 Americans succumb to the deadly effects of an overdose. While the above findings are promising, there continues to be a significant cause for concern, particularly with younger demographics. A new analysis of alcohol, drug use, and suicide among Millennials is startling.

Troubling Statistics About Alcohol, Drug Use, and Suicide


The latest federal data indicates that drug-related deaths skyrocketed 108% between 2007 and 2017 among people 18 to 34 years old. Alcohol-related deaths rose 69 percent and suicides increased 35 percent during the same period, USA Today reports. The findings were published by the organizations Trust for America’s Health and the Well Being Trust.

“There is a critical need for targeted programs that address Millennials’ health, well-being and economic opportunity,” says John Auerbach, CEO of the Trust for America’s Health and Massachusetts’ former health secretary. 

What are the driving forces behind what some experts dub “deaths of despair?” According to Mr. Auerbach, there are several, including:
  • Education debt
  • Housing costs
  • The Great Recession
  • Opioid epidemic
When people are unhappy, or they feel unable to get ahead in life, they are more likely to look for relief and escape. Drugs and alcohol can ease people’s worries for a time, but such effects are fleeting. Those who attempt to anesthetize their feelings put themselves at significant risk of developing a use disorder, and co-occurring mental illnesses as well.

The executive director of the mental health services non-profit agency, McClendon Center, Dennis Hobb, points out a disconnect between mental health and addiction services adds to the problem, according to the article. He said that it impacts patients who struggle with co-occurring illness.

“When people are ready for treatment you have to get them into treatment right now, you can’t wait,” said Hobb.

People who are dealing with a mental illness are at a higher risk of self-medicating with drugs and alcohol. The behavior can lead to behavioral health disorders, such as an addiction. It is vital that each condition is treated simultaneously. Many of the young people who resort to self-harm and suicide never receive treatment.

Faith-Based Dual Diagnosis


If you are struggling with alcohol or substance use and feel that you may be contending with a co-occurring mental illness, please contact Celebrate Hope. Our faith-based dual diagnosis treatment program can help you address both disorders concurrently.

We are standing by to answer any of your questions and to help you get on the road toward recovery.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Addiction Recovery Turns Lives Around

addiction recovery
Good people often find themselves struggling with issues that bring out their worst. Addiction is a condition that can lead people to the depths of despair. When men and women lack healthy coping skills and are in the grips of mental illness, they make decisions that can change their lives forever.

On this blog, we make a point of searching for stories of rebirth. Instances when individuals rise from the ashes of addiction and mental disease are worth retelling. Such stories can act as beacons of hope to all those who think that they are beyond help.

Jails, institutions, and death are said to await persons who do not receive assistance for addiction. Many people who’ve struggled with drugs and alcohol know that there is truth to those words. Nonviolent drug offenders make up a large portion of the U.S. prison population. There is also a significant number of inmates whose addiction lead them to commit previously unthinkable acts of violence.

While substance use is not a sound excuse for harming others, it does not mean that those who do are unredeemable. Addiction has brought many men and women to prison, but there are some who use their jail time to change their life.

Quintin Storey, 40, spent 19 years and seven months in a state prison located in Florida for committing second-degree murder, WBUR reports. His nearly two decades of imprisonment was a reformative period; he found addiction recovery and developed a passion for the culinary arts. Today, with the help of another chef in recovery, he is helping other felons as they transition back into the community.

 

From Prison to Addiction Recovery to Helping Others


Mr. Storey tells WBUR that he had a mostly normal childhood, one that involved family, music, and religion. He played sports and went to church; Quintin remembers being happy. Then, when he was ten, his whole world was flipped upside down—his parents divorced.

He found himself incapable of making sense of his parents separation through the lens of his devout Christian beliefs. Lacking coping skills, Storey began hanging out with the wrong crowd, smoking pot, and drinking. After high school, Quintin started using and selling drugs and abusing alcohol. In 1999, he was charged and convicted with homicide.

While in prison he started working in the kitchen, where he discovered a passion for cooking. In January 2018, Mr. Storey was released from jail; being a felon, he needed assistance. Then, Quintin learned about the REfire Culinary Program.

Chef Rebecca Kelly-Manders, 45, started REfire to assist felons transitioning back into society, according to the article. The eight-week program instructs students on knife handling and food safety.

“My darkest past can be a beacon of light for somebody else,” Rebecca says. “I can say, ‘Hey, look what I’ve walked through. You can walk through this, too. Let me show you how I did it.

The founder of the program knows how challenging it is for individuals with felonies on their record because of her past. Drug and alcohol addiction led Kelly-Manders on a destructive path; she was convicted on felony charges more than once before finding recovery.

In February 2018, Storey took the REfire course and graduated eight weeks later, the article reports. Despite being an exceptional student, he struggled to find a job. Kelly-Manders chose to hire Storey, making him supervisor of her cafe and the food protection manager at the Big Bend Homeless Coalition.

“My felony conviction was something that was basically a wall that was built up to where it was difficult for me to get a chance,” Quintin says. “And Rebecca helped to tear that wall down.” 

California Faith-based Addiction Treatment


We invite anyone struggling with addiction to contact Celebrate Hope to discuss treatment options. At our center, we rely on evidence-based modalities along with Biblical principles to help men and women discover lasting recovery.

Start celebrating hope today by speaking to a faith-based recovery specialist. (800) 708-3173

Friday, May 10, 2019

Mental Health Disorder Recovery

mental health
The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) reports that 43.8 million adults experience mental illness each year. That remarkable figure can be boiled down to 1 in 5 adults living with mental health conditions. About 10 million people, above the age of 18, live with severe behavioral health or mood disorders in the United States.

When looking at the startling facts about mental health in America, it isn’t challenging to see that many individuals face serious adversity. Those affected by psychological health disorders require care, therapy, and ongoing support for symptom management. They also require compassion and understanding from society.

Substance use disorders and depression, for instance, are highly stigmatized in the U.S. and abroad. Stigma causes people to feel shame and guilt about the problems they struggle with, even though those affected are not responsible for their disorders.

While addiction, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder are treatable, many men and women have difficulty accessing care. A significant number of people living with mental health disorders are reticent to seek assistance due to fear. Some will convince themselves that suffering in silence is better than having their peers look at them differently.

When mental health issues are ignored the result can be deadly; by the same token, stigma has fatal consequences. Fortunately, each day is a new opportunity to combat stigma, and encourage more people to seek life-saving support and adopt programs of recovery.

May is Mental Health Month (MHM)! In observance of the annual event, Mental Health America (MHA) is calling on every person to prioritize overall health and well-being. People in recovery can use the occasion to talk about their successes in recovery, perhaps inspiring others to make similar efforts.

Giving Hope to People with Mental Health Disorders


The fact that millions of Americans are in recovery from addiction and other forms of mental illness is indeed inspiring. It means that it is possible to lead a full, productive life in spite of a mental health disorder diagnosis. However, individuals do not recover on their own; effective treatment and continued maintenance are imperative.

When men and women share their story with others, it can have a cathartic effect on other people. There is power in sharing! Those who ignore the stigma and tell what it was like, what happened, and what it’s like now, give others hope. Those who share their personal experience inspire others to seek help and not give up, no matter what.

Mental Health Month is led by MHA, an organization that has been advocating for people living with mental illness for more than a century. The nonprofit spearheads several campaigns, many of which connect people living with psychological issues. One MHA initiative worth further discussion is #mentalillnessfeelslike.

Persons with social media accounts can share their struggles and successes with others who face similar experiences. Some will use the #mentalillnessfeelslike to ask questions about treatment and recovery. Help is out there, but sometimes an individual needs to hear about it first from real people, not experts.

There are other social media opportunities that people in recovery can utilize to inspire others to make changes. Please click here for a Mental Health Month toolkit, to help guide your involvement.

Through open and honest conversations about mental illness, we can affect real change in the lives of others. In the process, we can break the stigma of mental illness that stands in the way of recovery.

Almost 60 percent of adults with a mental illness didn’t receive mental health services in the previous year, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Together, we have the power to reduce that figure!

 

Faith-based Addiction and Dual-Diagnosis Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, our dedicated team of addiction professionals can help you or a loved one lead a fulfilling and productive life in recovery. Alcohol and substance use disorder is a form of mental illness. However, such conditions are often accompanied by one or more co-occurring mental illness.

It’s vital to treat the addiction and dual-diagnosis at the same time so that neither condition stands in the way of recovery. Please contact us today to learn more about our faith-based dual-diagnosis program.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

AAN on Pregant Women and Addiction

addiction pregnant women
The United States has come a long way in regard to putting an end to draconian drug laws. We are still far from the goal of decriminalizing addiction, a form of mental illness, but there is hope that one day, treatment will be the answer to all things mental health.

In many states across the country, the response to a low-level drug offense (simple possession for instance) is drug court. More and more people are being offered treatment over jail. Lawmakers are slowly discovering that addiction is not a problem that we can sweep under the rug, i.e., arrest away. For the first time, politicians are acknowledging that the “war on drugs” has done far more harm than good.

As the nation continues to wrestle with the opioid use disorder crisis, one that steals roughly 130 lives each day, compassion is quickly becoming a primary response. Stigmatizing and demonizing addicts harms us all. Who among us does not know someone who has struggled with addiction?

We are, all of us, touched by the deadly epidemic of addiction and the solution is treatment and long-term recovery. States and municipalities across the U.S. now realize that when those struggling find empowerment they are more likely to seek assistance. With help, individuals can avoid becoming an overdose death statistic. While many opioid addicts are finding that society is exercising a more compassionate understanding of addiction, at least one demographic has been left behind. Pregnant women and new mothers.

AAN Addresses Pregnant Women with a Substance Use Disorder


As the prescription opioid epidemic gained momentum, many hospitals began seeing an uptick in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). The condition affects newborns who were exposed to opioids in utero. Once born, babies experience the symptoms that an addict withdrawing from opioids faces. Extended hospital stays and close monitoring is required to mitigate the risk of the infant experiencing further complications.

In a fair number of states, using drugs during pregnancy is grounds for child abuse charges. In Alabama, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, and Wisconsin, mothers found to be exposing their unborn or newborn children to drugs face the threat of arrest. Just as with the war on drugs, punitive actions have the unintended effect of causing people to hide their problems. In the case of pregnant women, this can mean disastrous consequences for the child.

The American Academy of Nursing (Academy) released a policy brief calling for an end to criminal prosecution and punitive civil actions for pregnant and new mothers. The organization, 2,700-members strong, calls for a public health response rather than disciplinary actions. They contend that laws in the above states cause women to live in fear, which prevents them from accessing essential health services. The AAN writes:

“At the forefront of the national stage for the past several years, the opioid epidemic has expanded the public’s awareness of substance use disorders (SUDs) and treatments during this public health emergency. For pregnant women with SUDs however, punitive actions in place of a public health response have resulted in criminal charges, arrests, and incarceration for these women. This has reinforced a culture of fear and barriers to essential health services. Early entry into maternity care plays a vital role in long-term health and social outcomes. Recovery-oriented public health responses are urgently needed to shift the culture of punishment to one of enduring therapeutic intent for women as well as their infants, children, and families affected by SUDs.” 

Included in the policy brief are several suggestions to assist doctors and state and federal agencies, such as increasing:
  • Federal funding for SAMHSA State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis grants (Opioid STR) and Opioid STR Supplement grants that include SUD services for pregnant and parenting women and that develop community-based partnerships to ensure safe access to health services including prevention, treatment, and recovery supports for women, their children, and families.
  • State funding to ensure accessible community-based treatment, recovery supports, and health and social services for women, their children, and families affected by substance use regardless of immigration status or ability to pay for services.

 

Substance Use Disorder Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, we can help you or your loved one overcome and recover from substance use disorder. Please contact our team today to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment program. With cutting-edge treatment and Christian counseling, you can start celebrating hope today.

Friday, April 12, 2019

Alcohol Use Disorder is Treatable: Spread The Word


alcohol use disorder is treatable
When it comes to substance use and misuse, nothing compares to alcohol. Even opioid use disorder and overdose deaths pale in comparison to drinking. While alcohol is legal, it's far from harmless. 2.8 million deaths are caused by alcohol each year around the globe, according to Facing Addiction with NCADD. Nearly 90,000 Americans die from excessive alcohol use annually.

Alcohol use disorder affects some 17.6 million people in the United States, whereas 2.5 million are living with opioid use disorder. Prescription painkiller and heroin use continues to be a severe cause for concern, and it is vital that more be done to combat the epidemic we face. However, having a dialogue about alcohol use is of equal import considering the toll it takes on society. Talking about the impact of alcohol is arguably more vital given the data.

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) created Alcohol Awareness Month in 1987 with the above goal in mind. The organization sought to start a worldwide conversation about the dangers of alcohol. NCADD is committed to ending the age-old stigma of alcoholism that prevents those who suffer from seeking help.

In April, NCADD works with its affiliates across the country to organize events aimed at creating awareness and encouraging people with alcohol use disorder to find support. The theme of Alcohol Awareness Month 2019 is “Help for Today, Hope for Tomorrow.”

Spreading The Word About Alcohol Use Disorder


Alcohol use in the U.S. is a substantial problem from one demographic to the next. Old and young, white and black, affluent and impoverished; individuals from nearly every sector contend with AUD. Those who engage in risky drinking patterns put themselves at significant risk of experiencing health problems, including mental illness.

Those who begin drinking at a young age – in adolescence or early adulthood – are exponentially more likely to experience problems later in life. The list of potentially fatal health disorders that can arise from drinking too much is ever-expanding. Since 66.6 million people from age 12 to 17 report binge drinking, there is a significant cause for concern.

When one forms an unhealthy relationship with alcohol as a teen, then continues drinking heavily as an adult, they are almost certain to face problems. Not the least of which are alcohol use disorder and several other mental health disorders. Hazardous drinking can also result in cardiovascular troubles, liver disease, gastrointestinal issues, and many forms of cancer.

Of all hospital beds in the United States, 40 percent are being used to treat alcohol-related health conditions, according to Facing Addiction with NCADD. However, alcohol use is a treatable mental health condition. Early intervention can prevent others from developing health conditions stemming from alcohol consumption.

During Alcohol Awareness Month, we would like to encourage anyone who struggles with alcohol to seek assistance. Millions of Americans are working programs of recovery to lead productive lives, in spite of their illness. With help, you too can discover how to live a life in recovery and make lasting changes for the better.

Faith-based Alcohol Use Disorder Rehab


Celebrate Hope can help you begin a journey of recovery and rebuild your life. We utilize advanced medical treatments to help our clients break the cycle of alcohol use disorder and show our residents how to apply the teachings of Jesus Christ to their everyday lives.

Please contact us today to learn more about faith-based addiction treatment at Celebrate Hope.

Friday, March 29, 2019

An Open Letter About Addiction

The Addiction Policy Forum is an organization working to eliminate addiction as a major health problem in the following areas:
  • Raising Awareness
  • Prevention
  • Helping Patients and Families in Crisis
  • Promoting Treatment
  • Promoting Education and Advocacy
One of the organization’s more recent initiatives is #192aDay. The campaign takes its name from the ever-growing number of lives lost each day due to a drug overdose.

When the campaign started in 2016, the initiative was called #129aDay; based on Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) figures for 2014.

In 2017, the daily overdose death toll in America rose to a staggering 192 people, hence the update to #192aDay. The campaign, among other things, brings together individuals left behind when a loved one dies from an overdose. Sharing stories of loss can help others find treatment and recovery before tragedy strikes.

Overdose Goes Beyond Opioids


The daily number of overdoses is made up of several different drugs and types of drugs. Opioids may have the market share, but they are not alone. Prescription sedatives like benzodiazepines, alcohol, and methamphetamines show up in toxicology reports regularly.

America is the middle of an addiction crisis that goes far beyond the opioid epidemic. People who struggle with alcohol and substance use disorders do not fit a single stereotype. Addiction transcends socio-economic boundaries. It also affects people of all races, genders, age groups, and spiritual affiliations. Addicts can be parents, children, siblings, aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends.

#192aDay’s website is home to a remarkable number of powerful and poignant stories. What’s more, a group of brave individuals wrote an open letter recently. The letter’s title is: “9 Things We Wish We'd Known: A Letter From Families Who Have Lost a Loved One to Addiction.”

The letter opens with the statistic that every day in America 192 people die from drug overdose — that’s like a plane crashing each day, day after day. The authors add:  

We write this letter as families who have lost our sons, daughters, sisters, brothers, mothers, and fathers. We are from different communities, cultures, and religions but we have linked together, arm in arm in our shared heartbreak, to help other families impacted by the disease of addiction and to protect other families from this tragedy. 

This letter to you is about the things we wish we had known — the things we’ve learned since we suffered our losses and wish we had done differently.
  1. Don’t Ignore the Signs
  2. Don’t Wait for Rock Bottom
  3. Recovery Takes Time
  4. Find Quality Treatment
  5. Use all the tools in the toolbox
  6. Non-fatal overdoses are a key warning sign
  7. Pay attention to early substance use
  8. Understand the link between suicide and addiction
  9. Find Support
We invite you to read the letter in full, here.

“It’s time we recognize addiction for the disease that it is and move beyond the stigma that enshrouds substance use disorders,” writes Jessica Hulsey Nickel, founder of the Addiction Policy Forum. “192aDay helps shine a bright light on the beautiful lives lost to addiction and gives voice to the families that have been affected.”

 

Southern California Faith-based Addiction Treatment


When a person seeks treatment for a substance use disorder, they learn tools for working a program of long-term recovery. Still, detox and rehab are only the beginning of a lifelong process; continued progress depends on working with a support network day in and day out.

The parents’ letter provides several helpful points for any person who loves someone struggling with addiction. If you have a loved one who is living with untreated substance use disorder, please reach out to Celebrate Hope for support.

Our Christian treatment center provides compassionate, faith-based addiction programs for men and women. We utilize traditional treatment modalities along with Biblical principles to help people adopt a plan of recovery. Our dedicated team of addiction professionals is available at any time to answer your questions about our programs. Start celebrating Hope by contacting us today. (800) 708-3173

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Addiction Recovery Changes People's Lives

faith-based addiction treatment
Drugs and alcohol take a severe toll on many
men and women. Years of alcohol and substance abuse wreaks havoc on the mind, body, and spirit; so much, so that many individuals begin to believe that recovery is impossible. Fortunately, it is possible to break the cycle of addiction, adopt a program of healing, and reconnect with the spiritual side of life even when it seems like all hope is lost.

Addiction is a progressive mental illness, one that is often accompanied by other forms of mental health disease. Those who do not seek help are subject to similar outcomes; usually, such people become estranged from their families, struggle to hold down employment, regularly face legal troubles, and they can develop life-threatening physical health problems.

Men and women who struggle with addiction gradually find it more and more difficult to extricate themselves from self-defeating and self-destructive behaviors. They may try myriad ways to moderate their use or quit drinking and using outright, only to find themselves right back where they started in short order. Merely put, people who meet the criteria for alcohol, substance use disorder, or co-occurring mental illness require outside help and continued support.

Naturally, there are several different approaches to tackling addiction and bringing about recovery. At Celebrate Hope, we employ a faith-based approach; one that incorporates evidence-based treatment modalities with the 12-Step program model. We give our clients the tools to put Biblical principles to work for their addiction recovery; and, the faith-based approach “begins and ends with God’s forgiveness, healing, and restoration.”

Finding Grace In Recovery


Spirituality is a vital component of millions of men and women’s addiction recovery. Redeveloping a relationship with God or a “higher power” is a primary catalyst for making permanent changes in one’s life. Most people working a program of sobriety believe that their healing is nothing short of a miracle.

On this blog, we like to take the opportunity – from time to time – to share compelling and inspiring stories of hope. We understand that countless persons are actively battling substance use disorders. Many of them feel hopeless, and hearing of someone else's efforts to turn their life around can be an impetus for making similar changes.

Until last year, Jenni Tiderman’s family had all but resigned themselves to the belief that addiction would likely be her demise. Then, after 33 years of active addiction ( methamphetamine, alcohol, and marijuana), Tiderman found the strength to work a program of recovery, Peninsula Daily News reports. Last month, Jenni’s sister Maupin was able to provide her with a coin to commemorate one year of sobriety. Maupin is herself two years clean from heroin and meth.

“I get to give her the one year coin,” Maupin said. “I didn’t know she could make it here … but I feel more confidence [sic] in her daily. She’s doing the stuff she’s supposed to be doing, and I’m so proud of her.” 

Just over a year ago, Ms. Tiderman was homeless, holding signs on street corners, according to the article. She detoxed in jail and began to work the 12 Steps; Tiderman’s recovery was also supported by the Salvation Army early on. Now she finds strength and guidance from “meetings,” her church, and members of the community. Her sobriety has given her a roof over her head, partial and full custody of her children, a job, and the ability to inspire others.

“The community support has helped her quite a bit, and that’s where I think it’s so important for us as a community to remember that people struggling with addiction are sons and daughters too,” said Rev. Jason Himmelberger, Jenni’s pastor. “If we are to apply that same support to all of them, what would that do in their lives?”

Faith-based Addiction Recovery


Please contact Celebrate Hope if you’re struggling with addiction or co-occurring mental illness. We can answer any questions that you have about faith-based recovery. Our leading Christian treatment center can help you begin the journey to lifelong sobriety.

Friday, March 1, 2019

Nature Impacts Mental Health

Mental Health
Experts believe that nature, and exposure to natural environments, can play a significant role in mental health. Our connection to the world around us can have a dramatic impact on our wellbeing. Those who get outside and interact with their surroundings have a chance to quiet their mind and focus.

In the field of addiction recovery, a significant emphasis is placed on serenity—the state of being calm, peaceful, and untroubled. Active addiction is the embodiment of internal and external chaos; so, preventing relapse can hinge on staying grounded. Those in early recovery learn techniques for living in the moment, or just for today. They learn that a person has little control over the future and that they cannot change the past.

One of the best things a person in recovery can do is practice mindfulness; the psychological process of focusing on the present moment as much as possible. People who begin their journey of healing in treatment are taught mindfulness techniques, such as meditation and prayer. Clients who utilize tools that help them stay in the “now” can adopt a program of recovery with greater ease, typically.

At Celebrate Hope, our clients benefit significantly from the environment of our campus. Aside from comfy living quarters that are conducive to personal reflection, clients are treated to ocean views and grounds that facilitate both social interaction and serenity. When clients feel at ease in their surroundings, they can focus their attention on the present moment and fully commit to their recovery.

Nature and Mental Health


We know that when people are in an environment that has a calming effect, it aids the recovery process. However, new research may lend some credence to the importance of serenity-inducing surrounds for people in recovery. A large study, conducted by researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark, found that being raised near vegetation is associated with a lower risk of mental health disorders in adulthood, NPR reports. The research suggests that being exposed to “green spaces" might have significant physiological and psychological effects on human beings. The findings appear in the journal PNAS.

Interestingly, the scientists found that alcohol use disorder was most strongly associated with people who had a shortage of green space growing up, according to the article. The study shows that growing up near green space was associated with a 15 percent to 55 percent lower risk of developing psychiatric illness in adulthood. Of course, not everyone is fortunate enough to grow up next to a forest, but the researchers found that access to parks can have a similar effect.

"There are a lot of potential mechanisms to follow up on, but generally I think this study is tremendously important," said Kelly Lambert, a neuroscientist at the University of Richmond who studies the psychological effects of natural spaces. Lambert offers, "It suggests that something as simple as better city planning could have profound impacts on the mental health and well-being of all of us."

Addiction Treatment Surrounded by Natural Beauty


We invite men and women considering addiction treatment to take a virtual tour of Celebrate Hope at Hope By The Sea. We are confident you will see an environment that is conducive to your journey of healing. Please contact us to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment track.

Friday, February 8, 2019

Addiction Recovery Gives People Voices

addiction recovery
People in addiction recovery have a voice; for some people working a program, this is the first time in their life they have felt able to speak their truth. Men and women who battle addiction learn that they must hide and disguise their behaviors. The societal stigma of addiction creates a culture of silence. Being unable to open up about one’s issues perpetuates the cycle of disease.

Addicts and alcoholics are prone to feel as though they are broken souls. They convince themselves that they are responsible for their affliction. The guilt and shame that accompany mental illness prevent millions of people from reaching out for help. Sometimes, decades will pass before a person summons the courage to reach out for support.

While nobody is to blame for the development of chemical dependency, each person has some say in the choices they make from one day to the next. Naturally, becoming hooked on a substance often means risking physical withdrawal symptoms, if one decides not to use. Such symptoms can quickly precipitate a relapse before recovery can take hold — people who choose to embrace recovery benefit immensely from seeking professional assistance.

Once in treatment, men and women discover that they no longer need to let shame drive their actions. Such people realize that they have a voice and using it can help them and others manage their disease without resorting to drug and alcohol use. Each day, people around the world come together in meeting rooms to share their experience, strength, and hope. Individuals in recovery share openly and honestly about their past and current struggles.

Some will even take the message of healing outside the realm of anonymity and inspire others who are caught in the cycle of addiction.

 

The Voice of Recovery


Desiree-Anne Martin is an author who is clean and sober now for 14 years. Before heroin sunk its teeth in Martin, she was an aspiring writer; however, she would never dare write about her demons, let alone an addiction. Today, Desiree-Anne has a different perspective on the subject, having published an autobiography recently, EastCoastRadio reports. We Don’t Talk About It. Ever. makes clear that no one facing addiction or in recovery is alone regarding their fears about being open.

“I hope that the book has become more than just an outlet for me, but a beacon of hope for others,” she explains. Martin adds that “In so many communities, there’s this rule of sweeping things under the carpet and not talking about what’s going on.” 

“Speaking your truth takes courage but it brings an unbelievable sense of freedom,” she says. “Being honest with ourselves and others could be the secret to saving lives.”

 

California Faith-based Addiction Treatment


People who struggle with addiction or dual diagnosis have an opportunity to find recovery when they reach out for help. Asking for assistance is never simple, but understand the courage to do so is a life-saving decision. Please contact Celebrate Hope to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment program.  

We don’t just treat the symptoms of chemical dependency; we focus on transforming the mind, body, and spirit.

Friday, January 25, 2019

Educating Teens About Drugs and Alcohol

drugs and alcohol
Drugs and alcohol can take a toll on the human mind, and misuse can lead to a host of life problems. The adverse effects of using mind-altering substances, most often become apparent in adulthood. However, there is a statistically significant number of adolescents and teenagers who – in short order – present many of the criteria for having a use disorder.

While there exist treatment centers dedicated to treating minors living with addiction, the majority of people currently in recovery sought help in adulthood. A straw poll of individuals sitting in 12 Step groups and the like, would show that a high number of people began using at a young age. What starts as experimentation, usually due to unhealthy influences, can morph into a severe problem fairly quickly.

Few people understand just how significantly alcohol, and drug use, can impact life. When young individuals first start using, they don’t suffer remarkable consequences, they often experience the opposite. Experimenting can be an avenue to finding acceptance among teens who struggle to find connections with their peers. For these youngsters, substance use can even be a means of becoming relatable. Attending parties, imbibing and smoking pot, after all, has long been associated with the “cool kids” in school. A common misconception that is a sure path, for some, to feeling broken later in life.

Once a substance use problem develops, it is simple for teens to brush it off as being not that big of a deal. And, drug and alcohol use continues for years to come. Since most addicts and alcoholics learn how to disguise their issues early on, mental illness can continue unchecked for years. When considering that trend, it is vital that steps are taken to ensure every adolescent and teenager has the facts about drugs and alcohol.

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week


Young people are often times simultaneously precocious and reckless. A sense of invincibility is pervasive among young people, and they rarely like to be told how to Be. They know that adults drink alcohol and smoke marijuana, and that knowledge can lead one to think he or she can too. What they fail to understand is that scientists know that drugs and alcohol can do significant harm to the developing minds of teenagers. Researchers also tend to agree that the younger substance use initiation begins, the more likely such people are to struggle with a use disorder later in life.

It is vital that experts impress upon young people the dangers of substance use and abuse. When teens have the facts, they are more likely to make more educated, and safe choices. In observance of National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week or NDAFW, Celebrate Hope would like to encourage everyone to have a hand in spreading the word about substance use. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) firmly believes that together, we can SHATTER THE MYTHS® about drugs and alcohol!

Events have been taking place across the country and over the internet to bring young people together with experts in the field of medicine. The hope is that through discourse, some of the more common misconceptions can be dispelled. For more information about this important observance, please click here. We invite you to watch a short video on the subject below:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Faith-based Addiction Treatment


If you are a young adult, whose substance use is impacting your life in negative ways, then Celebrate Hope can help. Our Faith-based Addiction Treatment center combines comprehensive, cutting edge recovery services and Christian counseling to foster lasting change.

Friday, January 11, 2019

Addiction Recovery Miracles Aplenty

faith-based addiction treatment
People in addiction recovery are granted the opportunity to realize their dreams. Those who seek help and set out on the path of sobriety are able to accomplish just about anything. Even people with significant amounts of wreckage from their past can find a way to overcome obstacles and lead a fulfilling, productive life.

At Celebrate Hope, we have had the good fortune of seeing many men and women turn their life around with the help of God and a program of addiction recovery. Our clients come from all walks of life; while their stories are unique, they each share the common bond of mental illness, spiritual sickness, and desire to heal. With a yearning to get sober, and to embrace honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness, the cycle of addiction can be broken.

Of course, the decisions made while under the influence of mind-altering substances can significantly impact the course of one’s life. Some poor choices made in service to the disease can result in having to serve time in a penal institution and potentially leave a seemingly permanent mark on one’s record. For such people, deciding to lead a life in recovery doesn’t mean that a criminal record will not stand in the way of one’s dreams. But, as with all things in life, if a person chooses to continue to do the next right thing, good things can happen. At least, one man’s story makes that abundantly clear!

From Manufacturing Meth to Life In Recovery


Some 13 years ago, former meth user Derek Rygh was literally feeling the heat of his addiction. At the time, Rygh was allowing people to cook methamphetamine in his home in Minnesota, which, subsequently went up in flames, according to The Twin Cities Pioneer Press. Mr. Rygh did not deny to the police what was going on and he went on to be convicted for manufacturing meth. It turns out that this conviction may have been the best thing that ever happened to Rygh.

While in jail for his felony sentence, Rygh was accepted into a faith-based, inpatient addiction treatment program, the article reports. He was in the program for more than a year and never encountered a relapse.

“The program was not easy, but it was my only hope when I felt so completely hopeless,” he said.

After completing the faith-based addiction treatment program, Derek worked for two years to earn an associate degree in Christian leadership. He used the degree by working for the very treatment center that helped him turn his life around. The recovering meth addict got married and now has two children. The next chapter of Derek’s story indeed shows the miracles that recovery can provide.

“I want to become a nurse, but you can’t if you are a felon,” Rygh said. “I have had a lot of hardships in my life that I have survived and a lot of that had to do with nurses and doctors who I am grateful for.” 

The young man went before the Minnesota Department of Corrections’ Board of Pardons and requested a pardon extraordinary, which would clear his criminal record, according to the article. With 13 years sober, Rygh was granted his pardon in the twelfth hour of 2018.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


We invite men and women battling substance abuse disorder and other addictions to contact Celebrate Hope. Our supportive Christian rehab can help you find freedom from addiction and assist you in reconnecting with God. Our team of addiction professionals shows clients how to put Biblical principles to work as they journey toward long-term recovery.
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