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Friday, June 28, 2019

Exercise in Recovery is Beneficial

exercise in recovery
People in recovery who emphasize the importance of not just mental health, but physical health too, benefit significantly. The mind and body support one another in multiple ways; neglecting one side of the system impacts the other.

Evidence-based addiction treatment programs encourage clients to focus on eating healthy and exercising as a means of promoting healing. People with a history of drug and alcohol misuse are typically out of shape and malnourished. They may also have physical health problems associated with their addiction.

Taking steps to bolster physical wellbeing will help the body heal from the damage done and make people feel better. Moreover, physical fitness can benefit the mind in several ways; even light workouts release endorphins: a type of hormone produced by the nervous system. Endorphins are beneficial because they help men and women cope with pain or stress.

Individuals in early recovery are susceptible to high levels of stress in addition to physical and emotional pain. Anything that can be done to mitigate discomfort healthily promotes healing. Exercise can also serve as a distraction from the triggers and cravings that can lead to relapse.

Incorporating Exercise Into Your Recovery Routine


One of the first things that people who are new to recovery learn about is finding balance. A common pitfall among men and women in early sobriety is going full-steam-ahead into everything. As such, things that should be healthy can become counterproductive.

Introducing exercise to one’s life should take place at a moderate pace. Personal limitations must also be considered to avoid injuries. Diving head first with all a person has into working out can lead to problems. What starts as a healthy distraction can end up distracting a person from the needs of their program.

Those looking to prioritize their physical health do well to talk first with doctors, therapists, and support networks. If the goal is to feel better and to be able to handle stress without resorting to drugs and alcohol, asking for guidance on physical fitness in recovery is wise.

Naturally, men and women with limitations must look for low-impact activities. Short walks and swimming are examples of low-impact aerobic exercises. People with pre-existing physical health conditions should seek out exercise routines that will cater to their constraints.

Working out with a peer in recovery can help strengthen personal connections. Isolation isn’t recommended in early sobriety; finding someone who shares similar goals is doubly beneficial. There are also some physical fitness organizations bringing together men and women in recovery.

The Phoenix is a nonprofit organization operating in several states that offers anyone with at least 48 hours of sobriety the chance to engage with a community committed to staying active. The organization provides addicts and alcoholics an opportunity to participate in peer-led boxing, CrossFit, hiking, rock climbing, and running events.

California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Celebrate Hope assists adult men and women who are struggling with addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. Please contact us today to learn more about our faith-based addiction rehab center and the programs we offer.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Drugs, Alcohol, Suicide, and Millennials

overdose
Good news! New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests deaths from drug overdoses decreased slightly between 2017 and 2018. After two decades of steadily rising overdose death rates, a little headway has been made. There were 21.7 deaths per 100,000, compared to 20.8 deaths per 100,000 for the 12 months ending in the second quarter of 2018.

Efforts to increase access to addiction treatment services and the overdose reversal drug naloxone has paid off, some. However, the public health crisis this country faces is still as real as ever. As many as six million people could be living with an opioid use disorder involving the use of prescription painkillers or heroin.

Each day, more than 100 Americans succumb to the deadly effects of an overdose. While the above findings are promising, there continues to be a significant cause for concern, particularly with younger demographics. A new analysis of alcohol, drug use, and suicide among Millennials is startling.

Troubling Statistics About Alcohol, Drug Use, and Suicide


The latest federal data indicates that drug-related deaths skyrocketed 108% between 2007 and 2017 among people 18 to 34 years old. Alcohol-related deaths rose 69 percent and suicides increased 35 percent during the same period, USA Today reports. The findings were published by the organizations Trust for America’s Health and the Well Being Trust.

“There is a critical need for targeted programs that address Millennials’ health, well-being and economic opportunity,” says John Auerbach, CEO of the Trust for America’s Health and Massachusetts’ former health secretary. 

What are the driving forces behind what some experts dub “deaths of despair?” According to Mr. Auerbach, there are several, including:
  • Education debt
  • Housing costs
  • The Great Recession
  • Opioid epidemic
When people are unhappy, or they feel unable to get ahead in life, they are more likely to look for relief and escape. Drugs and alcohol can ease people’s worries for a time, but such effects are fleeting. Those who attempt to anesthetize their feelings put themselves at significant risk of developing a use disorder, and co-occurring mental illnesses as well.

The executive director of the mental health services non-profit agency, McClendon Center, Dennis Hobb, points out a disconnect between mental health and addiction services adds to the problem, according to the article. He said that it impacts patients who struggle with co-occurring illness.

“When people are ready for treatment you have to get them into treatment right now, you can’t wait,” said Hobb.

People who are dealing with a mental illness are at a higher risk of self-medicating with drugs and alcohol. The behavior can lead to behavioral health disorders, such as an addiction. It is vital that each condition is treated simultaneously. Many of the young people who resort to self-harm and suicide never receive treatment.

Faith-Based Dual Diagnosis


If you are struggling with alcohol or substance use and feel that you may be contending with a co-occurring mental illness, please contact Celebrate Hope. Our faith-based dual diagnosis treatment program can help you address both disorders concurrently.

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