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Friday, June 28, 2019

Exercise in Recovery is Beneficial

exercise in recovery
People in recovery who emphasize the importance of not just mental health, but physical health too, benefit significantly. The mind and body support one another in multiple ways; neglecting one side of the system impacts the other.

Evidence-based addiction treatment programs encourage clients to focus on eating healthy and exercising as a means of promoting healing. People with a history of drug and alcohol misuse are typically out of shape and malnourished. They may also have physical health problems associated with their addiction.

Taking steps to bolster physical wellbeing will help the body heal from the damage done and make people feel better. Moreover, physical fitness can benefit the mind in several ways; even light workouts release endorphins: a type of hormone produced by the nervous system. Endorphins are beneficial because they help men and women cope with pain or stress.

Individuals in early recovery are susceptible to high levels of stress in addition to physical and emotional pain. Anything that can be done to mitigate discomfort healthily promotes healing. Exercise can also serve as a distraction from the triggers and cravings that can lead to relapse.

Incorporating Exercise Into Your Recovery Routine


One of the first things that people who are new to recovery learn about is finding balance. A common pitfall among men and women in early sobriety is going full-steam-ahead into everything. As such, things that should be healthy can become counterproductive.

Introducing exercise to one’s life should take place at a moderate pace. Personal limitations must also be considered to avoid injuries. Diving head first with all a person has into working out can lead to problems. What starts as a healthy distraction can end up distracting a person from the needs of their program.

Those looking to prioritize their physical health do well to talk first with doctors, therapists, and support networks. If the goal is to feel better and to be able to handle stress without resorting to drugs and alcohol, asking for guidance on physical fitness in recovery is wise.

Naturally, men and women with limitations must look for low-impact activities. Short walks and swimming are examples of low-impact aerobic exercises. People with pre-existing physical health conditions should seek out exercise routines that will cater to their constraints.

Working out with a peer in recovery can help strengthen personal connections. Isolation isn’t recommended in early sobriety; finding someone who shares similar goals is doubly beneficial. There are also some physical fitness organizations bringing together men and women in recovery.

The Phoenix is a nonprofit organization operating in several states that offers anyone with at least 48 hours of sobriety the chance to engage with a community committed to staying active. The organization provides addicts and alcoholics an opportunity to participate in peer-led boxing, CrossFit, hiking, rock climbing, and running events.

California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Celebrate Hope assists adult men and women who are struggling with addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. Please contact us today to learn more about our faith-based addiction rehab center and the programs we offer.

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