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Saturday, October 12, 2019

Mental Illness Awareness Week: Experience, Strength, and Hope

mental illness
Those who have been touched by the cold hand of addiction know the deadly nature of stigma. Even in recovery, society still casts aspersions upon men and women. Many people still have an aversion toward living next to treatment centers and sober living homes. It’s proof that misunderstanding is still pervasive in America.

The plight of those living with mental illness is to deal with shame both in active addiction and in recovery. Imagine if a person with cancer was ostracized; then imagine a community still treating them different after being fortunate to have their disease go into remission. You can’t. Mental illness is one of a handful of severe medical conditions that patients are treated like pariahs in their community.

Stigma is nothing new; it’s one of the reasons that programs like Alcoholics Anonymous prioritize anonymity. Even though recovering addicts and alcoholics prove time and again to be productive members of society, they still cannot shake stereotypes.

Each year, experts in the field of mental illness commit themselves to help educate and enlighten the general public about psychological conditions. They encourage friends, families, employers, and schools to support better the millions of Americans who deal with symptoms of mental health disorders.

Organizations like the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) promote the idea that love can cure stigma. When men and women are hesitant to seek assistance, it affects all of society. NAMI reports that mood disorders are the most common cause of hospitalization for all people in the U.S. under age 45. Moreover, across the U.S. economy, serious mental illness causes $193.2 billion in lost earnings each year.

NAMI adds that depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Anxiety and depression cost the global economy $1 trillion in lost productivity each year. At the heart of these statistics is that mental health affects all of society.

Mental Illness Awareness Week 2019


Today is the last day of Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW). At Celebrate Hope, we would like to encourage you to take a moment today to join the movement. The effort to end stigma is a seminal cause in this day and age. What’s more, men and women in recovery are in a unique position to end the stigma that continues to hold them down.

Just as people in recovery are best able to help others stay sober, they are also able to help the general public see mental illness in a different light. Observances like MIAW, Mental Health Awareness Month, and National Recovery Month impel people in recovery to share their experience.

People struggling with mental illness need to know that they are not alone, and men and women in recovery can help to that end. NAMI has several campaigns and forums to guide individuals and help them to encourage others toward the light of recovery.

One person’s experience, strength, and hope can have a ripple effect; people in recovery must never discount the impact they can have on another person. Millions of people who need assistance can find empowerment from men and women in recovery.

Please click this link to learn how you can become involved in the movement to end stigma and inspire recovery. NAMI asks you to consider:

“You can make a difference for yourself and others by sharing your experiences and perspective. What has helped? What hasn’t? What has been most discouraging about your condition? What has given you hope?” 

Faith-based Addiction Treatment Center


If you or a loved one is battling addiction or a dual diagnosis, please contact Celebrate Hope. We have many programs and services that help men and women learn how to lead healthy productive lives in recovery. (888) 350-6910

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Cure Stigma: Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

stigma
The topic of suicide is of significant importance in the United States. It's the second leading cause of death among people aged 10-34 and the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

Suicidal thoughts are treatable, and suicide can be prevented. However, many people struggle to get the help they desperately need. Why? The answer is complicated, and many factors can prohibit one from seeking treatment for mental illness. However, stigma plays a role in preventing people from getting help, more times than not.

Mental illness like addiction and depression are common; one in five adults suffer from one or more types of mental health disorders. Science tells us that people are not to blame for mental illness. Still, many people in America believe that feeling depressed or developing a dependence on drugs and alcohol is a choice. They think that individuals could choose to be happier or decide to stop using mind-altering substances all on their own. The reality is altogether different.

Mental health disorders are complex diseases for which there is no cure. Fortunately, there are evidence-based treatments that can break the disease cycle and equip men and women with the tools to recover.

The shame that stigmas lead to prevents people from talking about their problems. When men and women are afraid to speak, they are less likely to seek treatment. As a society, we need to work together to acknowledge science and cure stigma. Doing so will save countless lives.

Suicide Prevention Awareness Month


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 46 percent of people who die by suicide had a diagnosed mental health condition. Interviews with family, friends, and medical professionals indicate that 90 percent of people who die by suicide had shown symptoms of mental illness, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

People who are experiencing suicidal thoughts can benefit from talking openly about their issues, but most are afraid of facing repercussions. It's so vital that we, as a society, come together to let those suffering know that support is available, treatment works, and recovery is possible. Individuals in recovery are in a unique position to help encourage others to seek help.

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month! The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is calling for the nation to rally behind men and women living with untreated mental health conditions. This includes those who are already working programs of recovery and those who are in therapy for mental illness.

Those in recovery all have a story to tell, and what they have to say can inspire change in people living in despair. If you are in recovery and would like to help NAMI spread messages of hope, then please consider sharing your experience with the world. You can anonymously discuss the obstacles you face and what you have done to make life improvements.

You Are Not Alone and OK2Talk are two safe, moderated spaces for sharing stories and creative expression about mental illness and suicide. If you are not comfortable with sharing your account, then you can help out in other ways. NAMI asks that you utilize the organization's promotional tools to disseminate essential facts about mental health and suicide. NAMI writes:

"It's important for people living with mental health conditions to know that they are not alone. Sharing a story about your personal experiences with mental health challenges can help in your own recovery as well as provide encouragement and support to others with similar experiences." 

Anything you can do to start discussions about mental illness will help to lessen the stigma that keeps people living in silence. Please use Suicide Prevention Awareness Month as an opportunity to inspire hope for recovery in others.

Faith-Based Addiction Recovery Center


At Celebrate Hope, we can help you break the cycle of addiction and address co-occurring mental illnesses. Our staff utilizes evidence-based addiction treatment modalities along with the teachings of Jesus to promote recovery in adult men and women. Please contact us today to learn more.

Please call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or call 911 immediately, if you are struggling with suicidal ideations.

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

A Voice for Recovery in You

Addiction recovery is possible for all who strive to make positive changes in their life. Unfortunately, countless people across the country feel unable or unwilling to reach out for assistance. It is a reality that needs to change.

In the 21st Century, there exist myriad resources for men and women in the grips of addiction or mental illness. Treatment centers, transitional living services, and support groups abound in America; but, many people struggle to find the courage to utilize available resources.

Some individuals are not ready, while others are paralyzed by the fear of what follows admitting they have a problem. The stigma of mental illness is a formidable force that still prevents people from seeking assistance. Society still harbors misguided perceptions about addiction, which leaves many people riddled with shame.

Fortunately, each American has within them the ability to end the stigma of mental and behavioral health disorders via compassion and understanding. Acknowledging the irrefutable science making it clear that alcohol and substance use disorders are complex diseases is an excellent place to start.

Nobody blames the person with diabetes for their condition; so should be the case for the alcoholic and addict. Instead, communities can do an excellent service and recognize the millions of people who are in long-term recovery. In doing so, more people will find the courage to seek help.

Addicts and alcoholics can no longer be treated as social pariahs if we ever hope, as a nation, to end the epidemic raging across America. People with use disorders are sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, and brothers and sisters. They are also friends, coworkers, and members of the world community who happen to have treatable health conditions.

During National Recovery Month, please join Celebrate Hope and other voices for recovery in spreading the message that treatment is effective and that people can and do recover.

National Recovery Month 2019


If you are one of the millions of Americans in recovery, then you can play a critical role during National Recovery Month. Your experience can affect change and potentially encourage other men and women to seek rehabilitation services.

This year is the 30th Anniversary of National Recovery Month; the theme is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Together We Are Stronger.” Just as you work with other alcoholics and addicts to stay clean and sober, you can unite with others in sobriety across the country to inspire change.

The official sponsor of Recovery Month, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), asks that you take time to submit your story online. Men and women in the grips of addiction may chance upon your words or video. Those who relate will feel empowered to follow your lead and take steps toward sobriety.

If you are not comfortable with disseminating your experience, that is your choice and right. However, you can still play an essential role in spreading messages of hope on social media. There are also events taking place in every state to raise awareness about prevention, treatment, and recovery support services.

There are many ways you can get involved with this vital observance, and we hope that you will help increase awareness. “Your efforts can help reduce the stigma around the impact of mental and substance use disorders, and support individuals living in recovery.”

Southern California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, we believe that that the miracle of recovery can be yours too during National Recovery Month and beyond. Please reach out to our team of addiction professionals to learn more about the many services we offer.

We rely on evidence-based treatments and the teachings of Jesus Christ to help bring about lasting recovery. Start Celebrating Hope Today!

Friday, August 23, 2019

Staying Clean, Sober, and Fit in Recovery

recovery
Following stays in addiction treatment, people in recovery understand that life will be different going forward. While they grasp the importance of finding healthy ways to occupy time, still many are unsure of how they will direct their energies. The first months after rehab can be a time of uncertainty.

Most men and women in the first year of their recovery spend a significant amount of time in the company of other clean and sober people. Attending meetings, working with sponsors or recovery coaches, and engaging with peers in recovery in one's free time is a recipe for success, after all. As one becomes stronger in their sobriety, a desire to do more and see other dreams realized is inevitable.

Each person's ambitions are different; some will endeavor to start a career or to bring one to new heights. In both scenarios, going back to school may be necessary for acquiring specific skills and credentials. One of the gifts that recovery provides is an ability to start something new and see it to the end.

After years of alcohol and substance abuse, it is common not to know what path to take once in recovery. A significant number of individuals in recovery never expected to find freedom from drugs and alcohol in the first place. As such, little forethought was ever put into what one would do if he or she ever found independence.

A route that some people in sobriety take involves choosing a career path that consists in being of service. There are many opportunities in the fields of addiction medicine and support. Helping other men and women walk a path of sobriety is a critical facet of recovery. So, it makes sense that some will opt to make a career of assisting others. Gary Rutherford of the UK is one of those individuals.

Helping People Stay Sober, and Get Fit in the Process


Rutherford combined his passion for sobriety and fitness to create a personal training program for men and women in recovery, BBC News reports. Sober for eight years now, he shows men and women with alcohol and substance-use disorders how to bolster both fitness and recovery. A desire to give others living with addiction hope was the impetus for ARC.

"I want to find the strength in that person and draw it out," Rutherford said. "I want to make that person feel like a person, empower them, make them thrive, encourage them."

In sobriety, Gary knew that he wanted to help others, so he went back to school to become an addiction nurse therapist. At the same time, he developed a passion for running and eventually CrossFit and strength training, according to the article. This led him to create ARC Fitness; ARC stands for Addiction Recovery Coaching. The not-for-profit personal training program's website states:

ARC Fitness supports individuals with substance use disorders to achieve healthy and sustainable recovery through the application of physical activity and positive lifestyle choices. 

Scott Reid was among the first group of six clients to go through ARC. He shares that he relapsed after completing a London-based treatment program and that he was feeling alone before finding Rutherford. ARC helped Scott reprioritize his recovery and gave him a sense of community.

"A group of six strangers came together and left as friends that understood one another. So if one of us felt down or was struggling we could pick up the phone or go out for a coffee or a walk or something."

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Celebrate Hope can assist you in ending the cycle of addiction and learning how to thrive in recovery. Our faith-based recovery programs rely on evidence-based therapies, in conjunction with the teachings of Jesus Christ. Please contact us today to learn more.

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Patrick Kennedy Reflects on Cousin's Overdose

mental health
The Kennedy family has a long history of falling victim to tragedy, from assassinations to substance abuse and mental health issues. Many Americans are familiar with Ted Kennedy’s alcohol use earlier in his career, which led to a car wreck that took the life of a young woman. His son Patrick, a vocal advocate for recovery and mental health parity, also struggled with substance use for many years.

Recently deceased author Christopher Kennedy Lawford was also in recovery for mental health-related issues. Last week, tragedy struck the family once again when Robert Kennedy’s granddaughter died from a suspected overdose, People reports. Saoirse Kennedy Hill, Patrick Kennedy’s cousin, died at the age of 22.

If the reports are accurate, Saoirse is now among the staggering number of Americans who lose their lives to an overdose. Three years before the young lady’s untimely death, she wrote an essay for her high school newspaper about her battles with depression and suicidal ideation.

"My depression took root in the beginning of my middle school years and will be with me for the rest of my life," Saoirse wrote. "Although I was mostly a happy child, I suffered bouts of deep sadness that felt like a heavy boulder on my chest."

At a time like this, who better to speak on the subject than former Rhode Island congressman Patrick Kennedy. 

 

Bringing Depression and Addiction Out of the Shadows


Patrick Kennedy has been fighting to end the stigma of addiction and mental health disorders for years. He has a track record for working on expanding access to treatment and recovery services. His effort to ensure that insurance companies cover mental health services, in the same way they would other diseases, has been instrumental in protecting the rights of millions of Americans.

Following his cousin’s death, Patrick shared some kind words about her with People. He said that "She opened the door for her peers to also come out and not feel shamed by this illness and she is a real hero in my family."

"She broke the silence. And we mourn her loss but her memory will live on as someone who wasn’t going to keep silent and wasn’t going to be feeling as if she had something shameful, but rather something medical that she sought treatment for."

Saoirse’s story is not unique; millions of Americans continue to struggle in the shadows with mental illness and substance use disorder. Patrick Kennedy used the opportunity to call for a more significant response in dealing with the epidemic we face.

"This affects every single family in America," said Kennedy. "It’s way past time that we deal with this in a way that we would deal with any other public health crisis."

Seeking Help for Addiction and Mental Illness


At Celebrate Hope, our thoughts and prayers go out to the Kennedy family. We understand the deadly nature of mental disease and hope that Hill’s memory will inspire other young people to seek assistance.

Please contact us at your earliest convenience if you are struggling with alcohol or substance use disorder. We offer several programs that can help you learn how to lead a life in recovery.

Friday, July 26, 2019

Honing Life Skills in Recovery

life-skills for recovery
Addiction recovery teaches people how to deal effectively with life on life’s terms. Even though a person has stopped drinking or drugging, they are still going to struggle with the demands and challenges of life. Since stress is one of the leading causes of relapse, it’s prudent to discuss some ways to keep it at bay. There are many things you can do to make navigating life in recovery less challenging.

Most people, it’s fair to say, lack specific life skills when they get to addiction treatment. Alcohol and substance use disorders take precedent over practically all else. It takes an enormous amount of effort to ensure one has their drink or drug of choice, day in and day out. Few people can manage other important tasks when in the grips of the disease. This is especially true for those who began using at a young age.

Neglecting nutrition, school, work, and bills go hand in hand with mental illness. Being responsible and accountable is not often said about those living with a use disorder. Neglecting aspects of one’s life becomes a vicious cycle. Failing to accomplish everyday tasks causes stress in a person’s life; addicts and alcoholics will use drugs and alcohol to cope with that stress.

In recovery, people learn that mitigating stress is vital. Men and women are taught that fostering life skills is a must, in order to maintain balance. Addiction thrives in extremes; if life becomes chaotic, the risk of relapse increases significantly. To avoid doing things that can jeopardize progress, men and women need to discover ways to keep their lives in order.

Life Skills for Addiction Recovery


There are several types of life skills, such as managing finances and living within your means. Other fundamental skills in life include practicing self-care (i.e., eating right and exercising), time management, and keeping an organized living space. Naturally, we could dedicate separate posts to each of the above skill sets. Today’s post will focus on the need for emphasizing the importance of organization.

Early recovery is a fragile time for individuals for several reasons. Sobriety is not a natural state for people with a history of addiction, nor is doing something every day to prevent a return to drugs and alcohol. Years and years of substance use changes how people think and process information. Such men and women have trouble dealing with anything that is outside their control. As such, it is vital to do things that establish and support equilibrium.

Organization is central to preventing outside variables from causing stress. Keeping a tidy household is critical since we spend most of our time in the place we reside. Knowing where essential belongings are will help you avoid getting upset when something can’t be found.

Doing laundry each week will ensure you have clean clothes for work and social engagements. Dedicating small chunks of time throughout the week to domestic chores will help you stay organized and prepared for whatever comes up. Moreover, having a clean living space can also improve how you feel.

Keeping an orderly domicile is a skill that dovetails nicely with financial management. Many people are inclined to let their mail pile up; they sometimes open envelopes weeks after receipt. Making a point of sorting your mail will contribute to tidiness and also help you stay on top of your bills. When bills are paid on time, it alleviates stress.

Honing your life skills takes practice, but it’s doable for anyone clean and sober. You might try dedicating certain days of the week for a particular task (i.e., dusting on Monday, laundry on Wednesday, and bills on Friday). It will make things more manageable.

Learning Life Skills in Christian Rehab


At Celebrate Hope, we believe that clients who adopt new routines are less likely to fall back on old behaviors. We work with clients to hone their life skills. Please contact us today to learn how our Christian drug and alcohol rehab center can help you overcome the emotional and physical bondage of addiction.

Friday, July 12, 2019

Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Alcohol Use

alcohol use
Alcohol is legal for adults over the age of 21 to use, even though it is responsible for more than 88,000 deaths per year. The toll the substance takes on families and society is enormous. Still, most people look fondly upon an opportunity to drink at the end of a long day or week.

Less than 100,000 alcohol-related deaths may not seem like much in the grand scheme of things. However, more people succumb to illnesses linked to alcoholism than that of opioids. Globally, 3 million lives are lost due to hazardous alcohol, the World Health Organization (WHO) reports. It is a staggering number, and the exact figure is substantially higher in all likelihood.

While most developed nations have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol, finding solutions to the problem is not simple. The legal status of drinking makes it challenging to tackle alcohol-related issues like addiction. Most states, counties, and cities lack the resources to assist everyone who drinks hazardously.

Addiction treatment and recovery services are wanting in many parts of the United States. The same is valid internationally. The WHO believes that they can offer some guidance in addressing the harmful use of alcohol. The organization has developed a global strategy to help nations reduce morbidity and mortality due to alcohol use.

How to Address the Social Consequences of Alcohol Use


“The WHO global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol seeks to improve the health and social outcomes for individuals, families and communities, with considerably reduced morbidity and mortality due to harmful use of alcohol and their ensuing social consequences. It is envisaged that the global strategy will promote and support local, regional and global actions to prevent and reduce the harmful use of alcohol.”

The organization focuses on ten specific areas of policy options and interventions at the national level. They include:
  1. Leadership, awareness and commitment
  2. Health services' response.
  3. Community action.
  4. Drink-driving policies and countermeasures.
  5. Availability of alcohol.
  6. Marketing of alcoholic beverages.
  7. Pricing policies.
  8. Reducing the negative consequences of drinking and alcohol intoxication.
  9. Reducing the public health impact of illicit alcohol and informally produced alcohol.
  10. Monitoring and surveillance.
At the heart of the organization’s plan is raising awareness and putting an end to stigmatization. They encourage nations to implement policies that will increase access to alcohol use disorder screenings and treatment services. Developing strategies that prevent easy access to alcohol by vulnerable and high-risk groups is also essential.

Countries that increase alcohol prices can reduce underage drinking and episodes of heavy use, according to the strategy. Moreover, it is vital that each new policy is monitored to determine which initiatives are successful.

If you would like to read more about the WHO global strategy on alcohol, please click here.

Faith-Based Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, we specialize in the treatment of alcohol use disorder; our team relies on a combination of faith-based principles and evidence-based modalities. Those who are able to adopt certain practices can turn their lives around completely.

Please contact us today to learn more about our compassionate, faith-based addiction programs and services.
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