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Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Prayer and Meditation in Recovery

prayer
During these difficult times, it's essential to manage and use your time wisely. Many of us are leading more isolated existences, and some are finding it challenging to prioritize their recovery. If you are cut off from your usual support channels (in-person meetings) because of COVID-19, please consider establishing a routine, prioritizing meditation and prayer. 

 

In early recovery, many have a hard time processing their thoughts, leading to old patterns coming back into the picture. If you are spending more time at home than in past months, it can be hazardous to your recovery. 

 

It's vital to find healthy ways to occupy your time and stick to a routine. Writing down a schedule will help you adhere to your routine, which will strengthen your program in turn. Determine how often you need to pray and meditate, attend meetings virtually or in-person when safe and available, eat healthy, and exercise. 

 

All of the above activities will help you in your recovery and weather the pandemic until life returns to normal. Always remember that you're not alone. Your support network is still a phone call away. Call someone whenever you find yourself struggling with a specific matter, especially if you are craving drugs and alcohol. 

 

With the above in mind, if you can adhere to a routine, you will be less likely to spend too much time in your head. Routines help individuals stay focused, and writing down your daily schedule ahead of time will help you stay on track. Many will argue that the time you spend praying and meditating is salient.

 

Is Prayer and Meditation Important to Your Recovery?

 

Those working a faith-based program of addiction recovery must prioritize their daily prayer and meditation. Upon waking each day, it's always beneficial to start your day by praying. 

 

"In praying, we ask simply that throughout the day God place in us the best understanding of His will that we can have for that day, and that we be given the grace by which we may carry it out." —Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, Pg. 102— 

 

People who meditate find that they are more open-minded and better able to receive guidance from the "higher power." Remember, each person can pray and meditate in their own way; there is no right way to communicate with your higher power. 

 

Having a conscious contact with a higher power is vital, but many people new to the program have a hard time with spirituality. You do not have to dive headfirst into spiritual concepts; you only have to keep an open mind when self-examining. Remember, spirituality isn't religion; but, religion is often a component of people's spirituality. 

 

"There is a direct linkage among self-examination, meditation, and prayer. Taken separately, these practices can bring much relief and benefit. But when they are logically related and interwoven, the result is an unshakable foundation for life." —Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions, Pg. 98— 

 

Prayer, meditation, and self-examination are critical to navigating life today. It isn't comfortable being cut off from one another; fellowship feels a little different from afar. However, the knowledge that you have supportive peers advocating for your well-being should give you pause and make you feel grateful. 

 

If you are not praying, it's never too late to start. If you find it challenging to pray, then ask one of your peers for guidance. Many people struggled at first like you are; they can help you introduce prayer and meditation into your routine. Once again, remember—you are not alone. 

 

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment Program

 

Please contact Celebrate Hope if you are struggling with drugs or alcohol. Our team utilizes comprehensive, cutting edge treatment and offers Christian counseling. We can help you break the cycle of addiction and reconnect with your higher power Jesus Christ.

Friday, October 9, 2020

World Mental Health Day 2020

mental health

We continue carrying the message of recovery at this time. The first full week every October is Mental Illness Awareness Week. As we have shared on numerous occasions, mental illness and behavioral health disorders like addiction can occur concurrently. More than half of individuals living with addiction have a co-occurring mental illness. 

 

All week long, organizations like the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have hosted events to raise awareness about the importance of mental health. Tuesday was National Day of Prayer for Mental Illness Recovery and Understanding and Thursday was National Depression Screening Day. Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, is World Mental Health Day and NAMIWalks National Day of Hope. 

 

Mental illness impacts the lives of one in five adults in America, according to NAMI. Close to one billion people are living with a mental health disorder worldwide, WHO reports. The scope and scale of mental illness demand our attention; mental health should be a priority for everyone, whether you have a mental health disorder or not. 

 

Each of us can help NAMI and WHO raise awareness about the prevalence of mental illness. We can all have a hand in eroding the stigma that prevents people from reaching out for help. NAMI invites you – if you are comfortable – to share your experience with mental illness. 

 

During Mental Illness Awareness Week. NAMI is featuring personal stories from people like you who are experiencing mental health conditions all week. NAMI also shares personal stories year-round as part of its You Are Not Alone campaign. During these difficult times, your story can encourage another to seek help and find recovery

 

World Mental Health Day

 

COVID-19 continues to strain the global health care system; thus, many people are struggling to get the care they need for mental illness. Since there isn't health without mental health, it's vital to encourage governments to channel resources toward mental health services. 

 

Tomorrow is World Mental Health Day. This year's theme is Move for mental health: let's invest. WHO, together with United for Global Mental Health and the World Federation for Mental Health, is calling for a significant "scale-up in investment in mental health." 

 

"World Mental Health Day is an opportunity for the world to come together and begin redressing the historic neglect of mental health," said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization. "We are already seeing the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on people's mental well-being, and this is just the beginning. Unless we make serious commitments to scale up investment in mental health right now, the health, social and economic consequences will be far-reaching." 

 

COVID-19 has forced billions of people to isolate themselves from each other. For those who struggle with mental illness, isolation can be hazardous. Many people have turned to drugs and alcohol to cope; self-medicating mental health disorder symptoms is pernicious

 

Perhaps more people than ever before will require assistance. A more significant investment in mental health services will help get quality, affordable mental health care. "With so many people lacking access to good quality, appropriate mental health services, investment is needed now more than ever," said Elisha London, Founder and CEO of United for Global Mental Health. 

 

"Everyone, everywhere can participate in this year's campaign. Whether you have struggled with your own mental health, know someone who has been affected, are a mental health expert, or if you simply believe that investing in mental health is the right thing to do, move for mental health, and help make mental health care and support accessible for everyone." 

 

Today, people around the globe are encouraged to participate in the 24-hour March for Mental Health. In order to safeguard your well-being, you can participate virtually. If you would like to take part, please click here

 

During World Mental Health Day, WHO is hosting a global online advocacy event on mental illness—the "Big Event for Mental Health." Tune in from one of WHO's social media channels to see WHO Director-General, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, world leaders, mental health experts, and celebrity guests as they talk about its importance of mental health. At the event, "WHO will showcase the work that its staff are doing around the world to reduce mental illness and the harmful use of alcohol and drugs."

 

Faith-Based Co-Occurring Disorder Treatment

 

Please contact Celebrate Hope to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment program for men and women. Our staff understands the importance of addressing both addiction and co-occurring mental illness. We can help you reconnect with your higher power, Jesus Christ, and begin the journey of recovery.

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