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Friday, March 20, 2020

Keeping Your Faith in Recovery During a Pandemic

recovery prayer
At Celebrate Hope, tonight our thoughts and prayers go out to the 17,000 people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States and the 223 people who have died. This pandemic is testing the faith of billions of people, and the public health crisis is far from being contained.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), along with other local, state, and federal public health agencies are advising everyone to stay home and limit interactions with other people. For many men and women, such advice is not challenging to adhere to, but that is not the case for most people. This is especially true for people working programs of recovery.

If you are currently working a program, then you grasp the importance of 12 Step meetings. You also know that working with others is the key to long-term recovery. Lasting sobriety is achieved together.

Still, it isn’t safe to be gathering in large groups, shaking hands, and physically embracing one another. Naturally, the above list is a 12 Step meeting to a T. The global pandemic has forced many 12 Step groups to close their doors to the public. Some peoples' homegroups are now utilizing digital platforms for conducting meetings and carrying the message, according to the General Service Office of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or GSO.

The AA resource center has published a statement online with information and advice for members of the recovery community. We hope you will take the time to read it at length.

The General Service of Alcoholics Anonymous U.S./Canada functions as a repository for AA members and groups who are looking for the shared experience of the Fellowship. As the global situation related to Coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to develop, we are fully committed to continue to serve as a resource center of shared experience to help navigate this unprecedented public health emergency.

Keeping Your Faith and Recovery Intact


We hope you are keeping yourself up to date regarding pandemic developments and on proper protocols for avoiding disease contraction. Washing your hands, avoiding crowds, and staying indoors are three sound recommendations for safeguarding your health.

Those of you in recovery must continue being vigilant about your program, even if you are unable to attend in-person meetings. It’s vital that you continue staying in close contact with your support network and sponsor. Utilize the resources available online for attending digital meetings.

What’s more, sticking to your recovery routine – as best you can – will help you protect your progress. Continue to pray and ask for guidance from your higher power to help you navigate these challenging times. People in recovery cannot lose their faith!

Prayer and constant contact with a God of your understanding are often all that stands between you and a relapse. You might find that you need to pray more during this unprecedented public health disaster.

In the coming days, many people in recovery will be spending a lot of time alone, which isn’t suitable for one’s program. However, online resources are available, and you have the tools to cope with the stressful days to come. If you begin to struggle, reach out for support immediately to prevent matters from worsening.

Faith-Based Addiction Recovery Program


At Celebrate Hope, our dedicated staff is adhering to the CDC guidelines regarding COVID-19. Our faith-based addiction treatment center is determined to protect the health and safety of our clients while also providing effective, evidence-based therapies. Please contact us today to learn more about our program.

Friday, March 6, 2020

Spotting the Signs of Addiction and Seeking Help

addiction
For people who struggle with alcohol and substance use disorders, making the decision to seek treatment takes a lot of courage. Those who do so and adopt a program of recovery will say that it was the most important decision of their life.

Accepting that you have a condition that is beyond your power to control on your own is the pathway to surrender. Those who decide to seek help will set out on a journey toward serenity, which is a foreign feeling to people in the grips of their disease.

Drug or alcohol addiction affects every area of one’s life; the disease is unforgiving, and impacts marriage, parenting, employment, friendships, finances, and spirituality. When addiction is left untreated, the condition can lead to jails, institutions, and even be fatal. So, if you are in the grips of despair resulting from drug and alcohol use, then please reach out for help now.

It’s likely that you are currently dealing with some of the negative impacts listed above. Fortunately, you have the power to turn your life around if you are willing to accept professional help. Addiction treatment is a jumping-off point for leading a healthy and productive existence. What’s more, choosing recovery opens the door for having God back in your life.

Depending on how long you have been using drugs or alcohol, you may not be sure that you have a problem that requires professional guidance. While we cannot diagnose mental and behavioral health disorders via blogs, we can provide you with some questions that can help you move from the denial to the acceptance stage. Your answers could lead you to get an expert assessment that results in entering treatment.

Spotting the Signs of Addiction


There are several different criteria for determining if one is dealing with alcohol or substance use disorder. Experts utilize the symptoms criteria found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, often called the DSM-5, for determining if a patient has a use disorder.

Clinicians will diagnose people with a mild substance use disorder if they have two or three symptoms. Those with four or five symptoms would be classified as having a moderate substance use disorder. An indication of a severe substance use disorder is having six or more symptoms.
  1. Taking the substance in larger amounts or for longer than you're meant to.
  2. Wanting to cut down or stop using the substance but not managing to.
  3. Spending a lot of time getting, using, or recovering from use of the substance.
  4. Cravings and urges to use the substance.
  5. Not managing to do what you should at work, home, or school because of substance use.
  6. Continuing to use, even when it causes problems in relationships.
  7. Giving up important social, occupational, or recreational activities because of substance use.
  8. Using substances again and again, even when it puts you in danger.
  9. Continuing to use, even when you know you have a physical or psychological problem that could have been caused or made worse by the substance.
  10. Needing more of the substance to get the effect you want (tolerance).
  11. Development of withdrawal symptoms, which can be relieved by taking more of the substance.
It can also be helpful to consider if any of these questions ring true with you:

Is my home life unhappy because of my drinking or drug use? Does my drug and alcohol use affect my spouse and children? Am I prone to anger or violence when I’m drunk or high? Is sleeping a challenge for me? Does drug and alcohol use affect my ability to work? Am I always late for work because I’ve been drinking or doing drugs? Do I use drugs or alcohol when I’m alone? Are mind-altering substances a coping mechanism for dealing with depression or anxiety? Can I be social with others when I’m not using alcohol or drugs?

Again, the above should be food for thought for you, not a diagnosis. It is only meant to give you a better idea about your relationship with drugs and alcohol. If you relate with some of the above, then it’s strongly advised that you reach out for further guidance.

California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


We invite you to contact Celebrate Hope to speak with a compassionate, highly-trained admissions counselor. They can help you determine if you can benefit from addiction treatment and answer your questions about our programs.

Celebrate Hope is a faith-based addiction treatment program located in Southern California. Our skilled team of addiction professionals utilizes evidence-based therapies, along with the teachings of Jesus Christ to help people begin the journey of recovery. Please call us today at (866) 751-2028 to learn more.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Having Fun Helps Prevent Relapse

fun in recovery
If you are new to addiction recovery, then you need to do everything in your power to prevent relapse. In treatment, your counselors and therapists taught you effective methods for coping with stress and emotions. You likely learned valuable tools for managing cravings and avoiding risky situations that can cause triggers.

Now that you are back in the world, either living in a sober living or at home, you are putting the tools you learned to use. Hopefully, you are attending 12 Step meetings, have found a homegroup, and are working with a sponsor already. If you are not, then we strongly encourage you to act immediately.

Addiction is a chronic mental and behavioral health disorder. Recovery depends on daily maintenance to keep your disease in remission. Those who think that they can take what they learned in treatment and go it alone usually end up relapsing in the first year of recovery.

Long-term addiction recovery requires fellowship; working with others is essential to continued progress. Without a support network, men and women fall back to being accountable to themselves only. Support groups, on the other hand, help you stay on track and are essential to preventing relapse.

Please do not discount the importance of bonding with others in recovery. People who you meet at 12 Step groups will both support your recovery and become life-long friends. Clean and sober friends take the place of old using buddies. Such individuals are who you will have clean and sober fun with when you're not in meetings or doing step work.

Clean and Sober Fun in Recovery


While addiction recovery is a serious matter, it’s vital to make time to have a good time. Men and women in sobriety are not sticks in the mud, and they know how to have fun in recovery.

If you are new to the program, then you may not know how to have fun without drugs and alcohol yet. Making friends with people in your support network is an essential ingredient in learning healthy methods of entertaining yourself.

It’s worth pointing out that having fun distracts you from thinking about the past or future too much. Getting outdoors and being active with your sober friends will help you stay present. Staying focused on the 'here and now' is crucial to achieving long-term progress.

Some individuals in early recovery are inclined to isolate, which is not healthy. Those who spend time with others outside of meetings strengthen their recovery significantly. Here in Southern California, we are fortunate to have mountains and the ocean as our playgrounds. People in recovery take advantage of the great outdoors, some ski and snowboard, while others go hiking or surfing.

Another excellent way of learning how to have fun in recovery is taking part in recovery retreats organized by Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous members or groups. There are also yearly conventions; thousands of young and older adults come together to have a blast in recovery. It can be a lot of fun to meet people from across the country and globe who share the same goal as you.

California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Please contact Celebrate Hope if your loved one needs assistance with an alcohol or substance use disorder. We help clients reconnect with the spiritual teaching of Jesus Christ and introduce them to 12 Step recovery. Our highly trained clinicians rely on evidence-based therapies to break the cycle of addiction and teach men and women how to prevent relapse.

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Understanding Spirituality in Recovery

faith-based addiction treatment.
Individuals who battle addiction are said to be spiritually bankrupt. You hear the expression quite frequently in the rooms of 12 Step recovery. Since programs like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous are spiritual programs, one of the primary goals is to embrace spirituality.

Unfortunately, the word spirituality – the quality of being concerned with the human spirit or soul as opposed to material or physical things – is one that many people get hung up on in early recovery. One could even argue that the term is intimidating for some as it smacks of the pulpit.

Many people in the grips of addiction do not have fond memories of their time with organized religion. Each person has their reasons, but it's essential to distinguish the difference between religion and spirituality; the latter is often referred to as the glue that holds one's recovery together.

Religion is a personal set or institutionalized system of attitudes, beliefs, and practices shared by a community that worships a common God. Spirituality is an individual practice involving a connection to something more substantial or greater than you (a Higher Power).

"Spirituality is the aspect of humanity that refers to the way individuals seek and express meaning and purpose and the way they experience their connectedness to the moment, to self, to others, to nature, and to the significant or sacred," says Christina Puchalski, MD.

At Celebrate Hope, we help clients reconnect with their Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, as they forge a path toward long-term recovery. It's a spiritual process that combines the principles of the 12 Steps with the teachings of Jesus. Many people find it helpful to follow the example of Jesus as they work to maintain a program of recovery.

Spiritual Solvency in Recovery


We should point out that religion is spiritual, but there isn't religion in spirituality. It is for that reason that newcomers shouldn't be intimidated by the higher power business of recovery. While millions of Christians work a program, countless other people believe in a different higher power.

There are no mandates on who or what you must connect with as you trudge the road of happy destiny. Find what works for you and go with it, whether it be Jesus, Buddha, or Nature. The lesson to be learned is that in recovery, you no longer maintain a delusion that you are calling the shots. Those who believe they are in complete control of every aspect of life are usually the people with the least control over their own life.

Working a program is an opportunity to break free from self-will and accepting that you cannot carry the load of life alone. People succeed in 12 Step recovery because they work together in selfless ways to achieve the goal of lasting sobriety. Each person's program is strengthened when they form a relationship with the spiritual realm.

Each person has the right to pray to whichever God they choose, and that is between them and their higher power. However, there are a significant number of people seeking recovery who once had a connection with Jesus and would like to have His guidance once more. Such individuals can benefit significantly from choosing a faith-based addiction treatment center. Such programs were designed to utilize evidence-based therapies in conjunction with Christian teaching to promote lasting recovery.

Christian Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Please contact Celebrate Hope to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment center. We are available around the clock to answer your questions about our program features and services. You can speak to a faith-based recovery specialist today by calling (866) 751-2028.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Friends Who are Good for Recovery

friends in recovery
Accepting that you have an addiction means that you will have to make a number of changes if long-term recovery is to be achieved. If you have attended an addiction treatment program or meeting of recovery, then you have learned that life is different now that you are clean and sober.

Naturally, it’s vital to stay away from environments that can jeopardize your recovery. Moreover, and this part is harder, you must stay away from many people with whom you once spent time. This is especially true when it comes to old using friends.

It’s challenging to say goodbye or cut off ties with individuals even when you know that they are not beneficial to your recovery. Still, your progress depends on altering the people you keep in your circle of friends.

If you attend meetings on a regular basis, then you have already begun fostering relationships with like-minded individuals. These people are replacing the individuals you once associated with; what’s more, such men and women care about your well-being and continued progress.

Making Friends in Recovery


Hopefully, you have already said goodbye to the people from your past. If not, there is no time like the present. Put all your energy into making new friends who do not use drugs and alcohol. Meetings are the best place to find the caliber of individuals who are suitable for your program.

The people that you attend meetings with share similarities with you, and understand what you have been through; you have a lot in common with such men and women. These individuals will not just help you stay the course of recovery; they will become lifelong friends.

Prioritize your relationships with others in sobriety, especially in early recovery. Ask people to get together after the meeting so you can get to know them better. In time, you will look forward to seeing the people in your support network. They will also invite you to do things with them in their free time.

Again, we understand that it’s hard to break ties with people who were your friends for years. However, anyone who is not supportive of your recovery is probably not that great of a friend at the end of the day. Acknowledging that reality will help you make hard choices that hugely benefit your recovery.

Please do not despair if you have trouble making friends in early recovery. It may take time for you to feel comfortable confiding and opening up with new people in your life.

Trust and believe that it will become easier the longer you stick around the rooms of recovery. Do not lose hope, and you will have a friend group before you know it. That's guaranteed!

California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Please contact Celebrate Hope today to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment program in Southern California. We can help you break the cycle of addiction, adopt a program of recovery, and assist you in reconnecting with your Lord and Savior. (866) 751-2028

Friday, January 3, 2020

Recovery 2020: Keep What Works

recovery
Celebrate Hope would like to wish everyone working a program of addiction recovery a safe, sober, and productive New Year. Naturally, we are hopeful that all of you were able to utilize your recovery toolbox to get through both Christmas and New Year’s Eve without an incident, i.e., relapse.

If you read our most recent post, then perhaps you gleaned some tips that helped you navigate the 12th hour of 2019? If you put the information to use, then it’s likely you made it into 2020 with your sobriety intact. Now, you can look ahead toward a productive 365 strengthening your recovery so that you have many more fruitful years to come.

At the start of a New Year, it can be beneficial to take a look back on what helped and hindered your recovery last year. There is a saying in rooms that is both simple and salient: keep what works and leave the rest behind.

While there is a formula to follow in the hopes of achieving long-term recovery, no two programs are exactly the same. What works well for you may not be as helpful for one of your peers and vice versa. Naturally, you will want to model your program on your sponsors; but there may be things that you do that he or she doesn’t, which is more than OK.

Perhaps you meditate and your sponsor prays, or maybe it’s the other way around? You might find speaker meetings more beneficial than open discussion meetings; on this subject, it is helpful to have some variance. Sharing is one of the cornerstones of 12 Step recovery. The point is that each member of the program has to find what works best for them; you have the freedom to choose what your daily regimen of recovery looks like as you trudge the road of happy destiny.

Reading and Writing in Recovery


We each learn about ourselves and find perspective in different ways. Some people read the approved literature voraciously, even after going through the Steps. Others place significant emphasis on daily journaling; they find that it helps them gain clarity on a myriad of subjects.

Naturally, working a program of 12 Step recovery requires that you do a fair amount of reading, especially early on in your journey. As your program strengthens, you are afforded more time to choose the ways and means of maintaining your sobriety. Do you journal or make gratitude lists regularly? Both writing tasks can be of great benefit.

Gratitude lists help you remember all that is excellent and helpful in your life. Such inventories can pull you out of a funk when you are feeling down or remind you of who you want to express gratitude towards. Journaling, on the other hand, is a practice you may want to look into if you haven’t already incorporated it into your program.

There are times when you may not feel ready to share your thoughts about something at a meeting. Making a practice of journaling can help you formulate and process your thoughts more cohesively. It will enable you to return to your homegroup in a better position to share what you are dealing with or about subjects where you may need some guidance.

This year, please consider taking the time to do some writing. You might find it challenging at first, but you will more than likely find it is beneficial in the end. An excellent starting point is journaling about what worked for you in 2019 and what didn’t; keep what works and leave the rest behind.

Faith-Based Recovery in 2020


If your or a loved one’s life is negatively affected by drugs and alcohol, then we invite you to reach out to Celebrate Hope. Our faith-based addiction treatment program is the ideal recovery launching point for people who adhere or for people who subscribe to the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Our team of highly trained addiction professionals combines evidence-based therapies with Christian principles. We help our clients reconnect and foster meaningful therapeutic relationships with Jesus Christ, as they work toward leading a life in addiction recovery.
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