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Friday, July 12, 2019

Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Alcohol Use

alcohol use
Alcohol is legal for adults over the age of 21 to use, even though it is responsible for more than 88,000 deaths per year. The toll the substance takes on families and society is enormous. Still, most people look fondly upon an opportunity to drink at the end of a long day or week.

Less than 100,000 alcohol-related deaths may not seem like much in the grand scheme of things. However, more people succumb to illnesses linked to alcoholism than that of opioids. Globally, 3 million lives are lost due to hazardous alcohol, the World Health Organization (WHO) reports. It is a staggering number, and the exact figure is substantially higher in all likelihood.

While most developed nations have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol, finding solutions to the problem is not simple. The legal status of drinking makes it challenging to tackle alcohol-related issues like addiction. Most states, counties, and cities lack the resources to assist everyone who drinks hazardously.

Addiction treatment and recovery services are wanting in many parts of the United States. The same is valid internationally. The WHO believes that they can offer some guidance in addressing the harmful use of alcohol. The organization has developed a global strategy to help nations reduce morbidity and mortality due to alcohol use.

How to Address the Social Consequences of Alcohol Use


“The WHO global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol seeks to improve the health and social outcomes for individuals, families and communities, with considerably reduced morbidity and mortality due to harmful use of alcohol and their ensuing social consequences. It is envisaged that the global strategy will promote and support local, regional and global actions to prevent and reduce the harmful use of alcohol.”

The organization focuses on ten specific areas of policy options and interventions at the national level. They include:
  1. Leadership, awareness and commitment
  2. Health services' response.
  3. Community action.
  4. Drink-driving policies and countermeasures.
  5. Availability of alcohol.
  6. Marketing of alcoholic beverages.
  7. Pricing policies.
  8. Reducing the negative consequences of drinking and alcohol intoxication.
  9. Reducing the public health impact of illicit alcohol and informally produced alcohol.
  10. Monitoring and surveillance.
At the heart of the organization’s plan is raising awareness and putting an end to stigmatization. They encourage nations to implement policies that will increase access to alcohol use disorder screenings and treatment services. Developing strategies that prevent easy access to alcohol by vulnerable and high-risk groups is also essential.

Countries that increase alcohol prices can reduce underage drinking and episodes of heavy use, according to the strategy. Moreover, it is vital that each new policy is monitored to determine which initiatives are successful.

If you would like to read more about the WHO global strategy on alcohol, please click here.

Faith-Based Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, we specialize in the treatment of alcohol use disorder; our team relies on a combination of faith-based principles and evidence-based modalities. Those who are able to adopt certain practices can turn their lives around completely.

Please contact us today to learn more about our compassionate, faith-based addiction programs and services.

Friday, June 28, 2019

Exercise in Recovery is Beneficial

exercise in recovery
People in recovery who emphasize the importance of not just mental health, but physical health too, benefit significantly. The mind and body support one another in multiple ways; neglecting one side of the system impacts the other.

Evidence-based addiction treatment programs encourage clients to focus on eating healthy and exercising as a means of promoting healing. People with a history of drug and alcohol misuse are typically out of shape and malnourished. They may also have physical health problems associated with their addiction.

Taking steps to bolster physical wellbeing will help the body heal from the damage done and make people feel better. Moreover, physical fitness can benefit the mind in several ways; even light workouts release endorphins: a type of hormone produced by the nervous system. Endorphins are beneficial because they help men and women cope with pain or stress.

Individuals in early recovery are susceptible to high levels of stress in addition to physical and emotional pain. Anything that can be done to mitigate discomfort healthily promotes healing. Exercise can also serve as a distraction from the triggers and cravings that can lead to relapse.

Incorporating Exercise Into Your Recovery Routine


One of the first things that people who are new to recovery learn about is finding balance. A common pitfall among men and women in early sobriety is going full-steam-ahead into everything. As such, things that should be healthy can become counterproductive.

Introducing exercise to one’s life should take place at a moderate pace. Personal limitations must also be considered to avoid injuries. Diving head first with all a person has into working out can lead to problems. What starts as a healthy distraction can end up distracting a person from the needs of their program.

Those looking to prioritize their physical health do well to talk first with doctors, therapists, and support networks. If the goal is to feel better and to be able to handle stress without resorting to drugs and alcohol, asking for guidance on physical fitness in recovery is wise.

Naturally, men and women with limitations must look for low-impact activities. Short walks and swimming are examples of low-impact aerobic exercises. People with pre-existing physical health conditions should seek out exercise routines that will cater to their constraints.

Working out with a peer in recovery can help strengthen personal connections. Isolation isn’t recommended in early sobriety; finding someone who shares similar goals is doubly beneficial. There are also some physical fitness organizations bringing together men and women in recovery.

The Phoenix is a nonprofit organization operating in several states that offers anyone with at least 48 hours of sobriety the chance to engage with a community committed to staying active. The organization provides addicts and alcoholics an opportunity to participate in peer-led boxing, CrossFit, hiking, rock climbing, and running events.

California Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


Celebrate Hope assists adult men and women who are struggling with addiction and co-occurring mental health disorders. Please contact us today to learn more about our faith-based addiction rehab center and the programs we offer.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Drugs, Alcohol, Suicide, and Millennials

overdose
Good news! New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests deaths from drug overdoses decreased slightly between 2017 and 2018. After two decades of steadily rising overdose death rates, a little headway has been made. There were 21.7 deaths per 100,000, compared to 20.8 deaths per 100,000 for the 12 months ending in the second quarter of 2018.

Efforts to increase access to addiction treatment services and the overdose reversal drug naloxone has paid off, some. However, the public health crisis this country faces is still as real as ever. As many as six million people could be living with an opioid use disorder involving the use of prescription painkillers or heroin.

Each day, more than 100 Americans succumb to the deadly effects of an overdose. While the above findings are promising, there continues to be a significant cause for concern, particularly with younger demographics. A new analysis of alcohol, drug use, and suicide among Millennials is startling.

Troubling Statistics About Alcohol, Drug Use, and Suicide


The latest federal data indicates that drug-related deaths skyrocketed 108% between 2007 and 2017 among people 18 to 34 years old. Alcohol-related deaths rose 69 percent and suicides increased 35 percent during the same period, USA Today reports. The findings were published by the organizations Trust for America’s Health and the Well Being Trust.

“There is a critical need for targeted programs that address Millennials’ health, well-being and economic opportunity,” says John Auerbach, CEO of the Trust for America’s Health and Massachusetts’ former health secretary. 

What are the driving forces behind what some experts dub “deaths of despair?” According to Mr. Auerbach, there are several, including:
  • Education debt
  • Housing costs
  • The Great Recession
  • Opioid epidemic
When people are unhappy, or they feel unable to get ahead in life, they are more likely to look for relief and escape. Drugs and alcohol can ease people’s worries for a time, but such effects are fleeting. Those who attempt to anesthetize their feelings put themselves at significant risk of developing a use disorder, and co-occurring mental illnesses as well.

The executive director of the mental health services non-profit agency, McClendon Center, Dennis Hobb, points out a disconnect between mental health and addiction services adds to the problem, according to the article. He said that it impacts patients who struggle with co-occurring illness.

“When people are ready for treatment you have to get them into treatment right now, you can’t wait,” said Hobb.

People who are dealing with a mental illness are at a higher risk of self-medicating with drugs and alcohol. The behavior can lead to behavioral health disorders, such as an addiction. It is vital that each condition is treated simultaneously. Many of the young people who resort to self-harm and suicide never receive treatment.

Faith-Based Dual Diagnosis


If you are struggling with alcohol or substance use and feel that you may be contending with a co-occurring mental illness, please contact Celebrate Hope. Our faith-based dual diagnosis treatment program can help you address both disorders concurrently.

We are standing by to answer any of your questions and to help you get on the road toward recovery.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Addiction Recovery Turns Lives Around

addiction recovery
Good people often find themselves struggling with issues that bring out their worst. Addiction is a condition that can lead people to the depths of despair. When men and women lack healthy coping skills and are in the grips of mental illness, they make decisions that can change their lives forever.

On this blog, we make a point of searching for stories of rebirth. Instances when individuals rise from the ashes of addiction and mental disease are worth retelling. Such stories can act as beacons of hope to all those who think that they are beyond help.

Jails, institutions, and death are said to await persons who do not receive assistance for addiction. Many people who’ve struggled with drugs and alcohol know that there is truth to those words. Nonviolent drug offenders make up a large portion of the U.S. prison population. There is also a significant number of inmates whose addiction lead them to commit previously unthinkable acts of violence.

While substance use is not a sound excuse for harming others, it does not mean that those who do are unredeemable. Addiction has brought many men and women to prison, but there are some who use their jail time to change their life.

Quintin Storey, 40, spent 19 years and seven months in a state prison located in Florida for committing second-degree murder, WBUR reports. His nearly two decades of imprisonment was a reformative period; he found addiction recovery and developed a passion for the culinary arts. Today, with the help of another chef in recovery, he is helping other felons as they transition back into the community.

 

From Prison to Addiction Recovery to Helping Others


Mr. Storey tells WBUR that he had a mostly normal childhood, one that involved family, music, and religion. He played sports and went to church; Quintin remembers being happy. Then, when he was ten, his whole world was flipped upside down—his parents divorced.

He found himself incapable of making sense of his parents separation through the lens of his devout Christian beliefs. Lacking coping skills, Storey began hanging out with the wrong crowd, smoking pot, and drinking. After high school, Quintin started using and selling drugs and abusing alcohol. In 1999, he was charged and convicted with homicide.

While in prison he started working in the kitchen, where he discovered a passion for cooking. In January 2018, Mr. Storey was released from jail; being a felon, he needed assistance. Then, Quintin learned about the REfire Culinary Program.

Chef Rebecca Kelly-Manders, 45, started REfire to assist felons transitioning back into society, according to the article. The eight-week program instructs students on knife handling and food safety.

“My darkest past can be a beacon of light for somebody else,” Rebecca says. “I can say, ‘Hey, look what I’ve walked through. You can walk through this, too. Let me show you how I did it.

The founder of the program knows how challenging it is for individuals with felonies on their record because of her past. Drug and alcohol addiction led Kelly-Manders on a destructive path; she was convicted on felony charges more than once before finding recovery.

In February 2018, Storey took the REfire course and graduated eight weeks later, the article reports. Despite being an exceptional student, he struggled to find a job. Kelly-Manders chose to hire Storey, making him supervisor of her cafe and the food protection manager at the Big Bend Homeless Coalition.

“My felony conviction was something that was basically a wall that was built up to where it was difficult for me to get a chance,” Quintin says. “And Rebecca helped to tear that wall down.” 

California Faith-based Addiction Treatment


We invite anyone struggling with addiction to contact Celebrate Hope to discuss treatment options. At our center, we rely on evidence-based modalities along with Biblical principles to help men and women discover lasting recovery.

Start celebrating hope today by speaking to a faith-based recovery specialist. (800) 708-3173

Friday, May 10, 2019

Mental Health Disorder Recovery

mental health
The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) reports that 43.8 million adults experience mental illness each year. That remarkable figure can be boiled down to 1 in 5 adults living with mental health conditions. About 10 million people, above the age of 18, live with severe behavioral health or mood disorders in the United States.

When looking at the startling facts about mental health in America, it isn’t challenging to see that many individuals face serious adversity. Those affected by psychological health disorders require care, therapy, and ongoing support for symptom management. They also require compassion and understanding from society.

Substance use disorders and depression, for instance, are highly stigmatized in the U.S. and abroad. Stigma causes people to feel shame and guilt about the problems they struggle with, even though those affected are not responsible for their disorders.

While addiction, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder are treatable, many men and women have difficulty accessing care. A significant number of people living with mental health disorders are reticent to seek assistance due to fear. Some will convince themselves that suffering in silence is better than having their peers look at them differently.

When mental health issues are ignored the result can be deadly; by the same token, stigma has fatal consequences. Fortunately, each day is a new opportunity to combat stigma, and encourage more people to seek life-saving support and adopt programs of recovery.

May is Mental Health Month (MHM)! In observance of the annual event, Mental Health America (MHA) is calling on every person to prioritize overall health and well-being. People in recovery can use the occasion to talk about their successes in recovery, perhaps inspiring others to make similar efforts.

Giving Hope to People with Mental Health Disorders


The fact that millions of Americans are in recovery from addiction and other forms of mental illness is indeed inspiring. It means that it is possible to lead a full, productive life in spite of a mental health disorder diagnosis. However, individuals do not recover on their own; effective treatment and continued maintenance are imperative.

When men and women share their story with others, it can have a cathartic effect on other people. There is power in sharing! Those who ignore the stigma and tell what it was like, what happened, and what it’s like now, give others hope. Those who share their personal experience inspire others to seek help and not give up, no matter what.

Mental Health Month is led by MHA, an organization that has been advocating for people living with mental illness for more than a century. The nonprofit spearheads several campaigns, many of which connect people living with psychological issues. One MHA initiative worth further discussion is #mentalillnessfeelslike.

Persons with social media accounts can share their struggles and successes with others who face similar experiences. Some will use the #mentalillnessfeelslike to ask questions about treatment and recovery. Help is out there, but sometimes an individual needs to hear about it first from real people, not experts.

There are other social media opportunities that people in recovery can utilize to inspire others to make changes. Please click here for a Mental Health Month toolkit, to help guide your involvement.

Through open and honest conversations about mental illness, we can affect real change in the lives of others. In the process, we can break the stigma of mental illness that stands in the way of recovery.

Almost 60 percent of adults with a mental illness didn’t receive mental health services in the previous year, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Together, we have the power to reduce that figure!

 

Faith-based Addiction and Dual-Diagnosis Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, our dedicated team of addiction professionals can help you or a loved one lead a fulfilling and productive life in recovery. Alcohol and substance use disorder is a form of mental illness. However, such conditions are often accompanied by one or more co-occurring mental illness.

It’s vital to treat the addiction and dual-diagnosis at the same time so that neither condition stands in the way of recovery. Please contact us today to learn more about our faith-based dual-diagnosis program.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

AAN on Pregant Women and Addiction

addiction pregnant women
The United States has come a long way in regard to putting an end to draconian drug laws. We are still far from the goal of decriminalizing addiction, a form of mental illness, but there is hope that one day, treatment will be the answer to all things mental health.

In many states across the country, the response to a low-level drug offense (simple possession for instance) is drug court. More and more people are being offered treatment over jail. Lawmakers are slowly discovering that addiction is not a problem that we can sweep under the rug, i.e., arrest away. For the first time, politicians are acknowledging that the “war on drugs” has done far more harm than good.

As the nation continues to wrestle with the opioid use disorder crisis, one that steals roughly 130 lives each day, compassion is quickly becoming a primary response. Stigmatizing and demonizing addicts harms us all. Who among us does not know someone who has struggled with addiction?

We are, all of us, touched by the deadly epidemic of addiction and the solution is treatment and long-term recovery. States and municipalities across the U.S. now realize that when those struggling find empowerment they are more likely to seek assistance. With help, individuals can avoid becoming an overdose death statistic. While many opioid addicts are finding that society is exercising a more compassionate understanding of addiction, at least one demographic has been left behind. Pregnant women and new mothers.

AAN Addresses Pregnant Women with a Substance Use Disorder


As the prescription opioid epidemic gained momentum, many hospitals began seeing an uptick in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). The condition affects newborns who were exposed to opioids in utero. Once born, babies experience the symptoms that an addict withdrawing from opioids faces. Extended hospital stays and close monitoring is required to mitigate the risk of the infant experiencing further complications.

In a fair number of states, using drugs during pregnancy is grounds for child abuse charges. In Alabama, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, and Wisconsin, mothers found to be exposing their unborn or newborn children to drugs face the threat of arrest. Just as with the war on drugs, punitive actions have the unintended effect of causing people to hide their problems. In the case of pregnant women, this can mean disastrous consequences for the child.

The American Academy of Nursing (Academy) released a policy brief calling for an end to criminal prosecution and punitive civil actions for pregnant and new mothers. The organization, 2,700-members strong, calls for a public health response rather than disciplinary actions. They contend that laws in the above states cause women to live in fear, which prevents them from accessing essential health services. The AAN writes:

“At the forefront of the national stage for the past several years, the opioid epidemic has expanded the public’s awareness of substance use disorders (SUDs) and treatments during this public health emergency. For pregnant women with SUDs however, punitive actions in place of a public health response have resulted in criminal charges, arrests, and incarceration for these women. This has reinforced a culture of fear and barriers to essential health services. Early entry into maternity care plays a vital role in long-term health and social outcomes. Recovery-oriented public health responses are urgently needed to shift the culture of punishment to one of enduring therapeutic intent for women as well as their infants, children, and families affected by SUDs.” 

Included in the policy brief are several suggestions to assist doctors and state and federal agencies, such as increasing:
  • Federal funding for SAMHSA State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis grants (Opioid STR) and Opioid STR Supplement grants that include SUD services for pregnant and parenting women and that develop community-based partnerships to ensure safe access to health services including prevention, treatment, and recovery supports for women, their children, and families.
  • State funding to ensure accessible community-based treatment, recovery supports, and health and social services for women, their children, and families affected by substance use regardless of immigration status or ability to pay for services.

 

Substance Use Disorder Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, we can help you or your loved one overcome and recover from substance use disorder. Please contact our team today to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment program. With cutting-edge treatment and Christian counseling, you can start celebrating hope today.

Friday, April 12, 2019

Alcohol Use Disorder is Treatable: Spread The Word


alcohol use disorder is treatable
When it comes to substance use and misuse, nothing compares to alcohol. Even opioid use disorder and overdose deaths pale in comparison to drinking. While alcohol is legal, it's far from harmless. 2.8 million deaths are caused by alcohol each year around the globe, according to Facing Addiction with NCADD. Nearly 90,000 Americans die from excessive alcohol use annually.

Alcohol use disorder affects some 17.6 million people in the United States, whereas 2.5 million are living with opioid use disorder. Prescription painkiller and heroin use continues to be a severe cause for concern, and it is vital that more be done to combat the epidemic we face. However, having a dialogue about alcohol use is of equal import considering the toll it takes on society. Talking about the impact of alcohol is arguably more vital given the data.

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) created Alcohol Awareness Month in 1987 with the above goal in mind. The organization sought to start a worldwide conversation about the dangers of alcohol. NCADD is committed to ending the age-old stigma of alcoholism that prevents those who suffer from seeking help.

In April, NCADD works with its affiliates across the country to organize events aimed at creating awareness and encouraging people with alcohol use disorder to find support. The theme of Alcohol Awareness Month 2019 is “Help for Today, Hope for Tomorrow.”

Spreading The Word About Alcohol Use Disorder


Alcohol use in the U.S. is a substantial problem from one demographic to the next. Old and young, white and black, affluent and impoverished; individuals from nearly every sector contend with AUD. Those who engage in risky drinking patterns put themselves at significant risk of experiencing health problems, including mental illness.

Those who begin drinking at a young age – in adolescence or early adulthood – are exponentially more likely to experience problems later in life. The list of potentially fatal health disorders that can arise from drinking too much is ever-expanding. Since 66.6 million people from age 12 to 17 report binge drinking, there is a significant cause for concern.

When one forms an unhealthy relationship with alcohol as a teen, then continues drinking heavily as an adult, they are almost certain to face problems. Not the least of which are alcohol use disorder and several other mental health disorders. Hazardous drinking can also result in cardiovascular troubles, liver disease, gastrointestinal issues, and many forms of cancer.

Of all hospital beds in the United States, 40 percent are being used to treat alcohol-related health conditions, according to Facing Addiction with NCADD. However, alcohol use is a treatable mental health condition. Early intervention can prevent others from developing health conditions stemming from alcohol consumption.

During Alcohol Awareness Month, we would like to encourage anyone who struggles with alcohol to seek assistance. Millions of Americans are working programs of recovery to lead productive lives, in spite of their illness. With help, you too can discover how to live a life in recovery and make lasting changes for the better.

Faith-based Alcohol Use Disorder Rehab


Celebrate Hope can help you begin a journey of recovery and rebuild your life. We utilize advanced medical treatments to help our clients break the cycle of alcohol use disorder and show our residents how to apply the teachings of Jesus Christ to their everyday lives.

Please contact us today to learn more about faith-based addiction treatment at Celebrate Hope.
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