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Friday, February 8, 2019

Addiction Recovery Gives People Voices

addiction recovery
People in addiction recovery have a voice; for some people working a program, this is the first time in their life they have felt able to speak their truth. Men and women who battle addiction learn that they must hide and disguise their behaviors. The societal stigma of addiction creates a culture of silence. Being unable to open up about one’s issues perpetuates the cycle of disease.

Addicts and alcoholics are prone to feel as though they are broken souls. They convince themselves that they are responsible for their affliction. The guilt and shame that accompany mental illness prevent millions of people from reaching out for help. Sometimes, decades will pass before a person summons the courage to reach out for support.

While nobody is to blame for the development of chemical dependency, each person has some say in the choices they make from one day to the next. Naturally, becoming hooked on a substance often means risking physical withdrawal symptoms, if one decides not to use. Such symptoms can quickly precipitate a relapse before recovery can take hold — people who choose to embrace recovery benefit immensely from seeking professional assistance.

Once in treatment, men and women discover that they no longer need to let shame drive their actions. Such people realize that they have a voice and using it can help them and others manage their disease without resorting to drug and alcohol use. Each day, people around the world come together in meeting rooms to share their experience, strength, and hope. Individuals in recovery share openly and honestly about their past and current struggles.

Some will even take the message of healing outside the realm of anonymity and inspire others who are caught in the cycle of addiction.

 

The Voice of Recovery


Desiree-Anne Martin is an author who is clean and sober now for 14 years. Before heroin sunk its teeth in Martin, she was an aspiring writer; however, she would never dare write about her demons, let alone an addiction. Today, Desiree-Anne has a different perspective on the subject, having published an autobiography recently, EastCoastRadio reports. We Don’t Talk About It. Ever. makes clear that no one facing addiction or in recovery is alone regarding their fears about being open.

“I hope that the book has become more than just an outlet for me, but a beacon of hope for others,” she explains. Martin adds that “In so many communities, there’s this rule of sweeping things under the carpet and not talking about what’s going on.” 

“Speaking your truth takes courage but it brings an unbelievable sense of freedom,” she says. “Being honest with ourselves and others could be the secret to saving lives.”

 

California Faith-based Addiction Treatment


People who struggle with addiction or dual diagnosis have an opportunity to find recovery when they reach out for help. Asking for assistance is never simple, but understand the courage to do so is a life-saving decision. Please contact Celebrate Hope to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment program.  

We don’t just treat the symptoms of chemical dependency; we focus on transforming the mind, body, and spirit.

Friday, January 25, 2019

Educating Teens About Drugs and Alcohol

drugs and alcohol
Drugs and alcohol can take a toll on the human mind, and misuse can lead to a host of life problems. The adverse effects of using mind-altering substances, most often become apparent in adulthood. However, there is a statistically significant number of adolescents and teenagers who – in short order – present many of the criteria for having a use disorder.

While there exist treatment centers dedicated to treating minors living with addiction, the majority of people currently in recovery sought help in adulthood. A straw poll of individuals sitting in 12 Step groups and the like, would show that a high number of people began using at a young age. What starts as experimentation, usually due to unhealthy influences, can morph into a severe problem fairly quickly.

Few people understand just how significantly alcohol, and drug use, can impact life. When young individuals first start using, they don’t suffer remarkable consequences, they often experience the opposite. Experimenting can be an avenue to finding acceptance among teens who struggle to find connections with their peers. For these youngsters, substance use can even be a means of becoming relatable. Attending parties, imbibing and smoking pot, after all, has long been associated with the “cool kids” in school. A common misconception that is a sure path, for some, to feeling broken later in life.

Once a substance use problem develops, it is simple for teens to brush it off as being not that big of a deal. And, drug and alcohol use continues for years to come. Since most addicts and alcoholics learn how to disguise their issues early on, mental illness can continue unchecked for years. When considering that trend, it is vital that steps are taken to ensure every adolescent and teenager has the facts about drugs and alcohol.

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week


Young people are often times simultaneously precocious and reckless. A sense of invincibility is pervasive among young people, and they rarely like to be told how to Be. They know that adults drink alcohol and smoke marijuana, and that knowledge can lead one to think he or she can too. What they fail to understand is that scientists know that drugs and alcohol can do significant harm to the developing minds of teenagers. Researchers also tend to agree that the younger substance use initiation begins, the more likely such people are to struggle with a use disorder later in life.

It is vital that experts impress upon young people the dangers of substance use and abuse. When teens have the facts, they are more likely to make more educated, and safe choices. In observance of National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week or NDAFW, Celebrate Hope would like to encourage everyone to have a hand in spreading the word about substance use. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) firmly believes that together, we can SHATTER THE MYTHS® about drugs and alcohol!

Events have been taking place across the country and over the internet to bring young people together with experts in the field of medicine. The hope is that through discourse, some of the more common misconceptions can be dispelled. For more information about this important observance, please click here. We invite you to watch a short video on the subject below:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Faith-based Addiction Treatment


If you are a young adult, whose substance use is impacting your life in negative ways, then Celebrate Hope can help. Our Faith-based Addiction Treatment center combines comprehensive, cutting edge recovery services and Christian counseling to foster lasting change.

Friday, January 11, 2019

Addiction Recovery Miracles Aplenty

faith-based addiction treatment
People in addiction recovery are granted the opportunity to realize their dreams. Those who seek help and set out on the path of sobriety are able to accomplish just about anything. Even people with significant amounts of wreckage from their past can find a way to overcome obstacles and lead a fulfilling, productive life.

At Celebrate Hope, we have had the good fortune of seeing many men and women turn their life around with the help of God and a program of addiction recovery. Our clients come from all walks of life; while their stories are unique, they each share the common bond of mental illness, spiritual sickness, and desire to heal. With a yearning to get sober, and to embrace honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness, the cycle of addiction can be broken.

Of course, the decisions made while under the influence of mind-altering substances can significantly impact the course of one’s life. Some poor choices made in service to the disease can result in having to serve time in a penal institution and potentially leave a seemingly permanent mark on one’s record. For such people, deciding to lead a life in recovery doesn’t mean that a criminal record will not stand in the way of one’s dreams. But, as with all things in life, if a person chooses to continue to do the next right thing, good things can happen. At least, one man’s story makes that abundantly clear!

From Manufacturing Meth to Life In Recovery


Some 13 years ago, former meth user Derek Rygh was literally feeling the heat of his addiction. At the time, Rygh was allowing people to cook methamphetamine in his home in Minnesota, which, subsequently went up in flames, according to The Twin Cities Pioneer Press. Mr. Rygh did not deny to the police what was going on and he went on to be convicted for manufacturing meth. It turns out that this conviction may have been the best thing that ever happened to Rygh.

While in jail for his felony sentence, Rygh was accepted into a faith-based, inpatient addiction treatment program, the article reports. He was in the program for more than a year and never encountered a relapse.

“The program was not easy, but it was my only hope when I felt so completely hopeless,” he said.

After completing the faith-based addiction treatment program, Derek worked for two years to earn an associate degree in Christian leadership. He used the degree by working for the very treatment center that helped him turn his life around. The recovering meth addict got married and now has two children. The next chapter of Derek’s story indeed shows the miracles that recovery can provide.

“I want to become a nurse, but you can’t if you are a felon,” Rygh said. “I have had a lot of hardships in my life that I have survived and a lot of that had to do with nurses and doctors who I am grateful for.” 

The young man went before the Minnesota Department of Corrections’ Board of Pardons and requested a pardon extraordinary, which would clear his criminal record, according to the article. With 13 years sober, Rygh was granted his pardon in the twelfth hour of 2018.

Faith-Based Addiction Treatment


We invite men and women battling substance abuse disorder and other addictions to contact Celebrate Hope. Our supportive Christian rehab can help you find freedom from addiction and assist you in reconnecting with God. Our team of addiction professionals shows clients how to put Biblical principles to work as they journey toward long-term recovery.

Friday, December 28, 2018

Returning to Recovery After Relapse

relapse
Each year around this time many addicts and alcoholics in recovery face an unfortunate reality. Stemming from stress, emotional upheaval, or any one of myriad reasons some men and women experience a relapse. While such events are undesirable, they do not spell the end of a person’s recovery.

People living with the disease of addiction are contending with an incurable mental illness. With that in mind, it is important to remember that active addiction recurrence is always a possibility; this is especially true if a person lets up on their program of recovery. What’s more, people who slip and relapse are prone to hiding a relapse from their peers owing to the shame and stigma that accompanies the disease. There is perhaps no other malady that humans suffer from that victims feel guilty about when relapse happens.

Everyone desires continued progress in recovery, but things happen, poor decisions are made that result in return to using drugs or alcohol. The problem of relapse is compounded by the fact that people feel they must hide such events from their support network. Some people will continue going to meetings and appear to be doing the work, only to go home and use once more. In that way, a slip can quickly morph into a full-blown relapse and thus, active addiction.

Given the deadly nature of the disease, it is vital that people who relapse come forward and share the news of their relapse. The sooner an admission takes place, the faster the process of healing can begin.

 

Don’t Let Guilt and Shame Stand In The Way of Recovery


The only person who gets hurt by omitting the occurrence of relapse is the person who relapsed. Some people think that they are fooling their peers, but they are only fooling themselves about the stakes of their disease. The longer a return to recovery is put off, the worse life becomes and the risk to one’s health is more significant.

If you relapsed, Celebrate Hope understands. We also are hopeful that you have already discussed what happened with your support network and the ball of recovery is rolling anew. If that is not the case, we strongly implore you to disregard the guilt and shame you might be feeling and act in your best interest. The members of your support group will understand, many of whom are probably no stranger to relapse.

A relapse can either be a tragedy or salient moment in recovery; it can be an opportunity to come back from an upset and invest oneself with more dedication to sobriety than ever before. Right now, there exist people with decades of clean and sober time who have a relapse in their recovery history. We would ask that you consider that before deciding to continue on the path you are on; because such individuals are proof that relapse does not have to be the end of the story but rather the beginning of something better.

Greater Assistance After A Relapse


Following a relapse, some individuals find that they need more than meetings to get back on track. They decide that to get back on track more structure is required. It is not uncommon for men and women to return to addiction treatment following a relapse, especially when such incidents result in a return to active daily drug or alcohol use. If you feel that you require professional assistance, then we invite you to reach out to Celebrate Hope to discuss treatment options.  

All of us at Celebrate Hope wish each person in recovery a safe and sober New Year! We hope everyone has a productive 2019 in recovery.

Friday, December 14, 2018

"Don't Deny Me:" Mental Health Parity Campaign

Despite the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA), a federal law meant to prevent issuers that provide mental health or substance use disorder benefits from imposing less favorable benefit limitations on those benefits compared to medical/surgical benefits, many insurance companies still deny claims. The passing of the Affordable Care Act took parity one step further, expanding mental health and substance use disorder benefits and parity protections for 62 million Americans. However, insurers still refuse to cover treatments for mental health conditions.

Addiction and co-occurring disorder treatment centers not only save lives, but they can also give individuals the tools to turn their lives around. Mental health recovery is good for everyone; there isn’t a family in America that does not include at least one loved one living with mental illness. Those who have access to evidence-based mental health services can recover, and so can their families.

As mentioned above, laws are in place to protect people with health insurance from being denied coverage. And still, the fight for mental health parity continues. One of the leaders of the effort to ensure Americans receive the benefits they deserve is one of the most vocal parity advocates, former Congressman Patrick Kennedy.

"Don’t Deny Me" Coverage


Patrick Kennedy, son of the late Senator Ted Kennedy, is no stranger to mental illness. It just so happens that the younger Kennedy is in addiction recovery. He was one of the architects of the MHPAEA, along with the bill’s co-authors Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici. While Mr. Kennedy is no longer a member of Congress, his battle to ensure Americans living with mental illness are afforded favorable benefits continues. He is spearheading a new campaign to raise awareness about parity and is encouraging individuals to join the fight to take insurance companies to task. The campaign website states:  

Join us in creating a consumer-driven movement to demand parity rights and save lives. More and more frequently, families are being ripped apart by overdoses and suicides because their health plans failed them. Recovery from mental health and substance use disorders is possible with treatment. Let’s break down the barriers to care with one powerful voice.

The webpage gives consumers valuable information about what to do if they feel their insurance provider is violating parity laws. It turns out, most people have no idea that their parity rights are being infringed. Please follow the link to learn more about mental health parity and discover ways you can join the effort to ensure that all who need assistance get the coverage they deserve under the law.

Addiction Treatment


At Celebrate Hope, we work together with your health insurance company to ease the financial burden of Christian addiction treatment. Please contact us if you are in need of assistance for yourself or a loved one; you can start celebrating hope today.

Friday, November 30, 2018

Gratitude: The Heart of Recovery

Many of our readers are familiar with the names David and Nic Sheff. Perhaps you have read the bestselling books about addiction and recovery from the father and son authors. For those of you who haven’t had an opportunity to immerse yourselves in their writing, please consider doing so at your earliest convenience. People recovering from mental illness and their families will discover a lot of useful information packed inside the Sheffs' books; titles which include:
The two writers have more books in their respective catalogs, but the titles above are an excellent place to commence reading. While the primary focus of the above reads is Nic’s addiction and recovery, there is much packed inside that the families of alcoholics and addicts can find useful for their lives. Alcohol and substance use disorder, after all, is a family disease; the condition does not discriminate, and without treatment, the outcomes are never optimistic.

 

The Heart of Recovery


recovery
It’s likely that you have seen the title, "Beautiful Boy" in the headlines of late due to a recent movie release. David Sheff’s memoir and Nic’s memoir were used as source material for the film. Those interested in seeing the movie would do well to read their publications first, but doing so is not a requirement for following along.

While we do not want to include spoilers in this article, we thought we'd share a few kernels from a recent interview Nic gave to The Fix. As a matter of fact, since finding sobriety Nic has written many articles for the online addiction and recovery news publication. Sheff was asked if gratitude is the very heart of his recovery? His response is inspiring:

 “Every day, gratitude is such an essential part of my existence. Battling this disease, I have gone through such hell that coming out the other side is something I need to acknowledge on a daily basis. I try to be grateful and to express my gratitude. The amazing thing about being sober is how you learn to appreciate and love the simple moments of life. I am so grateful to be able to go out on a walk with my dogs or go out to dinner with my wife. The little things are so sweet like just watching a movie. Gratitude is a gift of sobriety that I keep close to me.” 

Please take a moment to watch a short trailer:


If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

The Miracle of Recovery


Healing is possible for all who ask for help and are willing to take steps toward a better future. At Celebrate Hope, we can help you put an end to the cycle of addiction and bring about lasting changes. Please contact us today to learn more about our faith-based addiction treatment program. Help is available. Call Today! (800) 708-3173.

Friday, November 9, 2018

High-Volume Alcohol Use is Risky

alcohol use
Experts in the field of addiction medicine understand that there is no safe amount of alcohol. While one can imbibe the substance moderately and experience few, if any, problems, research continues to show that even occasional drinkers are at significant risk of health problems.

At Celebrate Hope, we use this platform to shine a light on drug and alcohol use with the intention of helping young people make informed decisions about substance use. Many factors determine who will experience issues with drug and alcohol use, but there are certain behaviors that experts believe elevate an individual's likelihood of developing a use disorder.

When it comes to alcohol – the most popular drug worldwide – heavy episodic use is associated with increasing one’s risk of developing an alcohol use disorder. Teenage and young adult binge-drinking is also a common trend among individuals who often go on to experience problems later in life. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) defines binge drinking as a pattern of drinking that brings a person's blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 grams percent or above; typically, when men consume 5 or more drinks or women consume 4 or more drinks in about 2 hours. People who drink heavily put themselves at a higher risk of alcoholism and alcohol-related health problems.

The Risks of High-Volume Drinking


Impressing the dangers of alcohol use upon young people is vital. It is fair to say that too many young adults fail to see the harm in high-volume drinking. A new group of studies shows that many college students do not grasp the specific behaviors and risk factors associated with alcohol-induced memory loss, otherwise known as ‘blackouts or brownouts,’ according to a Brown University press release. The findings come from three separate studies appearing in the journal Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, the journal Addictive Behaviors, and in the journal of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

"We don't yet know what long-term effects having a blackout or repeated blackouts has on the brain," said Kate Carey, a professor with the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown's School of Public Health. "We do know that having alcohol-related memory impairment is associated with other negative consequences." The consequences include:
  • Hangovers
  • Missed Classes
  • Fights
  • Sexual Assault
  • Overdoses
  • Mental Health Problems
The research shows that forty-nine percent of participating college students experience blackouts and brownouts in the past month, according to the press release. Brownouts were found to be more common than blackouts, 32% compared 5%.

“Studies like these, addressing attitudes toward blackout drinking as well as what students know and do not know about blackouts, give us clues about how we might intervene to reduce this high-risk outcome,” said Jennifer Merrill, an assistant professor of behavioral and social sciences at Brown who was involved in the studies. “This work helps us to identify where there is room to correct any misconceptions students have about the causes and consequences of blackouts.”

 

Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment


Again, there is no safe amount of alcohol! Risky drinking practices can be a slippery slope to myriad problems down the road. If you are struggling with alcohol use and are in college, we can help you break the cycle of use disorder and to begin working a program of recovery. Please contact us today.

Celebrate Hope would like to thank our veterans for their service, and we wish you a peaceful Veterans Day.
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