If you feel like God is far away,

ask yourself “who moved?”

Get Admitted

Friday, April 20, 2018

Opioid Addiction Survey Results

prescription-opioids
Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), and 64,000 Americans died of a drug overdose in 2016. Anyone can see that addiction in the United States is a serious cause for concern. It is worth pointing out that the general public has come a long way regarding views about prescription opioids; this is important because most experts agree that overprescribing is one of the major causes of the American opioid addiction epidemic.

As a country, we still have a long way to go! Many people do not have a problem sharing their pain medications with friends and family members. However, the number of people viewing medication diversion as a problem is growing. More Americans than ever, consider alcohol and substance use disorder as a disease and a treatable mental health disorder. Even still, efforts to raise public awareness and take the pulse of society regarding drug use remains of the utmost importance. A survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research aims to do just that, giving us a clear picture of areas that need consideration.

"In the national effort to grapple with the enormous issue of opioid addiction, it is important to know the level of awareness and understanding of Americans who find themselves in the midst of an epidemic that is claiming growing numbers of lives," said Caitlin Oppenheimer, senior vice president of public health at NORC. "This survey provides important, and in some cases troubling, information."


Opioid Addiction in America


NORC at the University of Chicago reports that Americans view the scourge of opioid abuse as a much more significant problem than just two years ago, according to the Associated Press. In 2016, only 33 percent saw prescription opioid misuse as a major issue; in two years' time, that figure rose by ten-percent. The survey shows that 13 percent have lost a relative or close friend to an opioid overdose.

"The number of people who recognize how serious the opioid epidemic is in this nation is growing," said Trevor Tompson, vice president for public affairs research at NORC. "There is clearly a continuing challenge to ensure that what is learned about the crisis is grounded in fact." 

The survey found that:
  • Two-thirds of respondents say their community is not doing enough to make treatment programs accessible and affordable or to find improved methods of treating addiction.
  • Sixty-four percent would like to see more effort to crack down on drug dealers.
  • Fifty-seven percent of Americans have experience dealing with substance misuse ranging from taking a painkiller that wasn't prescribed to overdosing.
  • Twenty-four percent say they have an addicted relative, close friend, or that they (themselves) are addicted to opioids.
Unfortunately, some of the findings were less than encouraging. The research indicates that 32 percent say addiction is the result of a character flaw or poor parenting; fewer than 1 in 5 Americans are willing to associate closely with anyone addicted to prescription drugs. Such findings are a clear indication that the stigma of addiction remains alive and well in America. It is vital that we all continue to work toward educating the general public about mental illness


Opioid Use Disorder Treatment


If you are struggling with opioid use disorder, involving either prescription drugs or heroin, please contact Celebrate Hope at Hope By The Sea. We can help you break the destructive cycle of opioid addiction and provide you with the tools and skills necessary for achieving lasting recovery.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Young People's Perceptions About Alcohol Use

alcohol use
Many of our readers are aware of the fact that April is Alcohol Awareness Month; it is an opportunity to educate young people and adults about alcoholism, treatment, and recovery. Naturally, as with most events like AAM, the primary focus is to reach young people with the hope of helping prevent the consequences of alcohol use.

Of course, it doesn’t make any sense to maintain the hope that educating young people will prevent alcohol use altogether, but even reaching some of the demographic is valuable. Teenagers and young adults harbor many misconceptions of drinking that experts work tirelessly to dispel. A significant number of American youth fail to understand the slippery slope that is heavy alcohol consumption evinced by the rates of binge drinking. When unsafe drinking behaviors prevail, the likelihood of developing an alcohol use disorder down the road increases dramatically.

With the aid of the current research available, hopefully, we can all have a hand in disabusing teens and young adults over the myths of alcohol use. Knowledge is a powerful tool that, if wielded correctly, can change people’s perceptions about drinking.

 

Youth Perceptions About Alcohol


A new study presents interesting findings on the subject of alcohol use in college. Researchers conducting a secondary analysis of a longitudinal study reveals the value of having a greater insight into young people’s attitudes about alcohol, Science Trends reports. The findings were published in the journal Addictive Behaviors.

Study lead author, Angelo M. DiBello, of Brown University, and his colleagues found that a person’s positive attitude of “heavy alcohol use” was notably associated with consuming more alcohol, binge drinking more often, and are more likely to experience alcohol-related problems, according to the article. Whereas, those with approving attitudes about of “moderate alcohol use” are less likely to consume alcohol, binge drink, or experience problems related to imbibing.

The researchers define heavy drinking as 4 or more drinks for women and 5 or more drinks for men on a single occasion. Moderate alcohol use they define as less than 4/5 drinks for woman/men at one time.

Alcohol is a substance that can cause significant harm. The findings of this analysis could help experts better target their prevention efforts. The research helps to paint a clearer picture of the reasons why young people drink in unhealthy ways, the article reports. As a result, the study could assist in the creation of new prevention and intervention methods.

 

Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment


Celebrate Hope at Hope by The Sea can help any young adult break the destructive cycle of alcohol use disorder. We provide clients with the tools and skills necessary for leading a productive life in addiction recovery.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Eating Healthy In Recovery

recovery
You are what you eat! So, the age old saying goes, are valuable words to heed and can help you as you walk the road to happy destiny in recovery. It should go without saying that a good many people in recovery are not the best at taking care of themselves. People in the grips of active addiction rarely excel at putting their physical wellbeing at the top of their priority list; it’s challenging to concern yourself with eating healthy when a person is just trying to make it through the day without experiencing withdrawal symptoms. Let’s face it; food is hardly a primary concern among people using drugs and alcohol in destructive ways.

Given that recovery is the opposite of addiction, one must endeavor to do everything differently, which includes diet and exercise. Those of you who have sought the help of addiction treatment centers might have undergone a crash course on nutrition. Many rehab centers actually employ nutritionists to design client dietary plans. If that was your experience, it is likely you came away from it with a better understanding of how to take care of yourself and your recovery, in turn.

Having made a commitment to recovery, hopefully, you make a point every day to nourish your body and mind with foods conducive to wellbeing. Of course, it not always easy to eat healthy all the time. Grabbing a healthy snack isn’t always possible, but whenever you can, please, seize the opportunity. Addiction is a mental illness; what we put in our body, feeds our minds; thus, healthy eating is conducive to promoting a healthy mind.

 

Mental Health is Everything


It is worth mentioning that one of the byproducts of years of active addiction is poor physical health. Alcohol and drugs take a detrimental toll on vital organs; since all the organs (including the brain) work together to keep the mechanisms of life operating—eating as healthy as possible is the goal. A significant number of people who welcome recovery into their life struggle with health conditions that require monitoring; for instance, many alcoholics also have diabetes. Failing to watch what they eat can be deadly for such people. There are other examples, but you probably get the message.

At Boston Medical Center, people in recovery now have access to a culinary class called, "Cooking for Recovery,” ABC News reports. Successful outcomes are more likely to come about when the whole patient/client receives treatment; abstaining from drugs and alcohol, while important, it just one facet of recovery.

"Good health care is about more than just direct clinical services," said Michael Botticelli, executive director of the medical center's Grayken Center for Addiction and former director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. "Recovery is not just about stopping the use of alcohol and drugs, it's about how do we return people to a sense of wellness and a sense of well-being." 

Dietitian and chef Tracy Burg, who leads the classes, says addiction strips people of vital nutrients, according to the article. She adds, that when people no longer have drugs and alcohol in their life, they often crave sugar. Addicts and alcoholics may not realize that sweets target some of the same neurotransmitters as mind-altering substances. People in recovery who are eating unhealthy gain weight and experience blood sugar fluctuations; they are also at risk of depression and possible relapse.

 

Addiction Recovery


At Celebrate Hope, we stress the importance of nutrition to our clients; we understand that all the pieces matter in recovery. Please contact Celebrate Hope at Hope By The Sea, to learn more about how we can help you begin a remarkable journey of addiction recovery.

Friday, March 30, 2018

Rebirth, Resurrection, and Recovery on Easter Sunday

recovery
The Vernal Equinox is now behind us, officially marking the end of winter and beginning of spring; this is a time commonly associated with new beginnings. This time of the year should resonate with people working programs of addiction recovery, given that your recovery officially marked a new start in life. Most of you are probably aware that Easter Sunday (or Resurrection Sunday) occurs this weekend, and for many Christians, it is the most critical time of the year. Again, the circumstances of this celebration can speak to people working programs of abstinence; your recovery is, in effect, a form or resurrection.

During this time in history over the span of just a few days, Jesus had the “Last Supper” (Passover), he was crucified (Good Friday) and rose from the dead (Easter). This weekend, billions of people around the globe will observe one or all of the unique events listed above; it is a fact that more than a considerable number of such people are in addiction recovery.

If you are beginning the process of healing or have been in the program for a time, you have probably come to understand that big holidays can place a heavy burden on recovery. With that in mind, it is entirely paramount that you do everything in one’s power to strive for serenity. Before and after attending your religious service and spending time with your family, please make a point of attending meetings. Spending time with your peers in recovery will help you steer clear of risky situations that can lead to relapse. You can also benefit from acknowledging some of symbolism of the extraordinary days ahead as they pertain to recovery.

 

Finding Meaning In Recovery


Alcohol and substance use takes an enormous toll on the mind, body, and spirit. Use disorders are a mental health issue, many of the behaviors and actions that typify the disease are the byproduct of self-will run riot. Years of self-defeating and self-destructive behaviors leave a person with a hardly recognizable version of their former self. It is safe to say that when the addict and alcoholic are finally ready to accept treatment and dedicate themselves to recovery, they are living in the depths of despair. In some cases, addicts and alcoholics are knocking on death’s door.

Recovery offers people a chance at finding a form of living salvation. Those who commit themselves to opening their heart and mind to the sunlight of the spirit have an opportunity to take back their life. It is important to remember that substance use is a symptom of a far more profound spiritual problem. Drugs and alcohol serve as a barrier to connecting with your “higher power,” and without spiritual guidance in one’s life, the prospect of healing goes out the window. Once the fog of anesthetization lifts, you are better able to reach out and ask for God’s assistance in finding your way. Speaking relatively, after a short time enmeshed in the program you can begin setting right your existence. You rise from the ashes of active addiction and start sowing the seeds of progress; and, there isn’t a limit to what you can achieve with the principles of recovery in your head and God in your heart.

Addiction recovery is a second chance, and you should never downplay the importance of this opportunity. Remember, that not everyone is fortunate enough to find recovery; the nature of untreated addiction is exceedingly fatal. Over the weekend perhaps you might exercise gratitude for this life-saving gift, this rebirth. Draw power from the spirit that accompanies you on your path toward healing

 

Addiction Recovery


Celebrate Hope would like to wish you a safe, sober, and spiritual Good Friday and Easter Sunday. If you are actively in the grips of alcohol or substance use disorder, please contact Celebrate Hope at Hope by the Sea. Our experienced staff of addiction professionals can help begin the life-changing journey of addiction recovery.

Friday, March 23, 2018

Alcohol Industry Funds NIAAA Research

alcohol
People working in the field of addiction understand that there isn’t any safe amount of alcohol for those in recovery. One beer quickly leads to another, and the cycle of addiction continues. Everyone working a program tries various ways to moderate their drinking before concluding that they need help; there isn’t a cure for mental illness, any attempt to curb use on your own will find you right back where you started.

Alcohol is an exceptionally caustic substance. Even if booze weren't addictive, those who drink too much of it are at significant risk of adverse effects on their health. A large percentage of people who choose treatment have conditions relating to their heart, liver, and pancreas. It can be easy to think that only alcoholics experience health problems relating to alcohol use. The truth is, addiction isn't a prerequisite for experiencing alcohol-related illness. Which, begs the question, is there any amount of alcohol that is safe to imbibe? Of course, in regard to addicts and people with alcohol use disorders, the answer is, no! What about your average adult that doesn’t have a problem with the substance? The latter question is much harder to answer, for several reasons.

With each year that passes, it seems like researchers discover a new way in which alcohol wreaks havoc on the human body. It’s highly likely that you have read headlines saying that a little wine is good for your heart, and the like. Doctors throughout modern history have gotten behind pseudoscience to support the idea that drinking can be useful for both mind and body. Some physicians and scientists, whatever their reasons, propagate ideas that can harm rather than help uninformed people.

 

Big Alcohol Wants People to Drink More


The global alcohol industry is a multibillion-dollar affair, controlled by just a few mega-conglomerates. The more people drink, the more money companies like Ab InBev rake in annually. Naturally, significant purveyors of alcohol know that they are peddling a substance that can cause severe harm; so, it makes sense that they would love to see scientists publish research that supports the idea that some alcohol is good for the drinker. What better way to go about realizing that goal than funding said research?

You’d probably think that it would be the alcohol industry requesting researchers to focus on proving that some amounts of alcohol are safe; however, a new expose shows the opposite. The New York Times reveals that the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), an agency that has long been at odds with big alcohol, successfully solicited alcohol industry executives to fund their research. With the help of millions of dollars from five alcohol companies, NIAAA researchers are conducting a controlled trial to see if moderate drinking reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. The agency says the test “represents a unique opportunity to show that moderate alcohol consumption is safe and lowers risk of common diseases.” As you can imagine, medical professionals and scientists are not impressed with the newfound kinship.

The NIAAA study “is not public health research — it’s marketing,” Michael Siegel, a professor of community health sciences at Boston University School of Public Health, told Times reporter Roni Caryn Rabin. An investigation is underway to get to the bottom of what currently appears to be a scandal.

 

Alcohol Use Disorder Recovery


If alcohol has made your life unmanageable, please contact Celebrate Hope at Hope by the Sea. Our experienced staff of addiction professionals can help you begin the life-changing journey of addiction recovery.

Friday, March 16, 2018

Music That's Right For Recovery

recovery
Music is an integral part of most people’s lives; without it, existence would be exceedingly dull. We all have bands, singers, and songwriters whose arts speaks to us in ways that are hard to describe. Few words can accurately convey how a song makes you feel inside; excited, amped, relaxed, and alive are a few that might come to mind. Music can be your best friend when you are having a hard time in life; if you are struggling through a situation, then putting an album on can give you perspective or give you a brief respite from your woes. Simply put, instruments in harmony can be quite cathartic; which means that people in recovery can significantly benefit from listening to some tunes.

While it is true that the right melody and lyrics can bring you back to earth or help you carry on in times of mental strife, there is an excellent chance that certain songs or bands are inextricably linked to your past substance use. Everyone working a program of recovery can probably think of a song that, if they were to hear it, would bring back memories of getting drunk or high. Naturally, such associations between music and using drugs is problematic for people in early recovery. One must do everything in their power to limit exposure to anything that might trigger a desire to use.

That’s not to say that you have to turn your back on all your favorite bands just because you used to listen to them under the influence. But, given that hearing a song may only remind you of the fun you had in active addiction, rather than the heartache, you can benefit from steering clear of particular artists or types of music when recovery is in its infancy. It's possible that you were taught this in treatment when the facility confiscated you iPod.

 

Is This Beneficial to My Recovery?


In life, triggers can arise from just about anywhere and from anything. Those dedicated to working a program of addiction recovery must take steps to avoid specific people, places, and things. If you are unable to cut ties with particular individuals or stay out of wet areas, you will find it challenging to keep on track. Remember, there is only one thing we need to change in recovery, everything!

If you recently completed an addiction treatment program and find yourself back in the real world diligently avoiding the trappings of drugs and alcohol, it might be time to reconsider your record collection for the foreseeable future. At least until your program of recovery is strong enough to rebel against any urges to use that might stem from listening to music. Naturally, you don’t have to cut music out for your life completely, just exercise caution when it comes to your playlist.

Recovery is a journey toward progress. We adopt specific practices and foster behaviors and traditions that will give us the power to abstain from drugs and alcohol for the rest of our lives. If you know that certain types of music or a given artist is deeply associated with your past, then it is easy enough to stay away. Perhaps you might broaden your musical horizons by giving something new a chance. There are plenty of artists who are in recovery themselves who write songs that speak to others in the program. Ask your peers what they listen to these days, you can make this task a bit of an adventure. Who knows what you might discover along the way?

 

Addiction Recovery


Have drugs and alcohol negatively impacted your life and well-being? At Celebrate Hope we can assist you in laying a foundation for lasting recovery. Please contact us today to begin the journey.

Friday, March 9, 2018

SAMHSA National Prevention Challenge

You cannot turn back the clock, if you have an alcohol or substance use disorder, you will contend with the disease for the rest of your life. Such a reality is a difficult thing to process at times, but it shouldn’t be a cause for malaise. Those living with mental illness can lead productive, healthy lives provided they take “certain steps” to keep the condition in remission (for lack of a better word).

If you are working a program of addiction recovery, then you know that life today is a complete 180 from your previous existence. Instead of acting selfishly in service to your disease, you act selflessly in service to your recovery. Instead of looking for ways people can benefit you, you strive to aid others in their quest for lasting change. The idea being that if you want to keep the improvements made in your life, you need to affect change in the lives of others. If you're going to keep what you have, individuals in recovery need to give it away.

There are various ways you can pay it forward in recovery. Sharing in meetings, working with a newcomer, and answering your phone when another person in the program calls are ways to give back. However, there are subtler ways that you can affect change in your small sphere of influence; as a matter of fact, how you go about your day today can inspire others to make little changes that can have a massive impact in their life.

 

A Healthier Tomorrow In Recovery


Early recovery is both a confusing and trying time for most people adopting a new way of living. Those in their first year of recovery have said goodbye, in many cases, to a dear and deadly friend; learning how to live without mourning the loss of drugs and alcohol isn’t an easy task. Although, while removing mind-altering substances from your life is especially beneficial, the rub lies in practicing the principles of recovery in all your affairs.

When you consider what you need to change (perceptions and behaviors), you realize that the only thing that needs to change is everything. Abstaining from drugs and alcohol is monumental, changing the way you look at things and proceed through your day in ways conducive to your health is paramount. All the pieces matter in recovery! Individuals must diligently maintain and act in ways advantageous to your mind, body, and spirit.

Once the mind becomes clear(er), and you get into the swing of daily meetings, calling your sponsor, working the steps, and so on and so forth, then please strongly consider making small adjustments to your routine. Please do not dive headfirst into making alterations talk to your sponsor beforehand; everything in its right time in recovery, always. After careful and cautious consideration, perhaps you can incorporate exercise and healthier eating into your program. Recovery significantly improves your physical and mental health, but working a program isn’t a panacea. Any auxiliary efforts made for your health can drastically improve your quality of life, i.e., exercise, mindful eating, and quitting smoking. Did you know that researchers believe smoking increase the risk of relapse?

If you can adopt new behaviors that are conducive to healthy living, doing so can and will encourage people with less time. Ask yourself, ‘what can I do today to ensure a healthier tomorrow?’

 

SAMHSA National Prevention Challenge



As all of us approach the ides of March, we thought it prudent to bring National Prevention Week (NPW) to your attention. The annual health observance means to increase public awareness of, and action around, substance abuse and mental health issues. See the schedule below:
  • Monday, May 14: Promotion of Mental Health & Wellness
  • Tuesday, May 15: Prevention of Underage Drinking & Alcohol Misuse
  • Wednesday, May 16: Prevention of Prescription & Opioid Drug Misuse
  • Thursday, May 17: Prevention of Illicit Drug Use & Youth Marijuana
  • Friday, May 18: Prevention of Suicide
  • Saturday, May 19: Prevention of Youth Tobacco Use
Why are we bringing NPW to your attention now, at the beginning of March? Good question! The event is brought to you by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and one of the components of NPW is the National Prevention Challenge. The organization has already begun accepting submissions for the challenge. SAMHSA wants to know:  

What would you say to your future self about what you’re doing today to ensure a healthier tomorrow? Share your answer by joining the NPW 2018 Prevention Challenge: Dear Future Me!
 

If you are having trouble watching, please click here.
CignaAetnaBlueCross BlueShieldUnited HealthcareMore Options/Verify Benefits

Connect With Our Campus Pastor

Our Christian counselors and campus Pastor walk with clients in their journey of recovery and reconnection to God.


Request a Call From Us