If you feel like God is far away,

ask yourself “who moved?”

Get Admitted

Friday, March 16, 2018

Music That's Right For Recovery

Music is an integral part of most people’s lives; without it, existence would be exceedingly dull. We all have bands, singers, and songwriters whose arts speaks to us in ways that are hard to describe. Few words can accurately convey how a song makes you feel inside; excited, amped, relaxed, and alive are a few that might come to mind. Music can be your best friend when you are having a hard time in life; if you are struggling through a situation, then putting an album on can give you perspective or give you a brief respite from your woes. Simply put, instruments in harmony can be quite cathartic; which means that people in recovery can significantly benefit from listening to some tunes.

While it is true that the right melody and lyrics can bring you back to earth or help you carry on in times of mental strife, there is an excellent chance that certain songs or bands are inextricably linked to your past substance use. Everyone working a program of recovery can probably think of a song that, if they were to hear it, would bring back memories of getting drunk or high. Naturally, such associations between music and using drugs is problematic for people in early recovery. One must do everything in their power to limit exposure to anything that might trigger a desire to use.

That’s not to say that you have to turn your back on all your favorite bands just because you used to listen to them under the influence. But, given that hearing a song may only remind you of the fun you had in active addiction, rather than the heartache, you can benefit from steering clear of particular artists or types of music when recovery is in its infancy. It's possible that you were taught this in treatment when the facility confiscated you iPod.


Is This Beneficial to My Recovery?

In life, triggers can arise from just about anywhere and from anything. Those dedicated to working a program of addiction recovery must take steps to avoid specific people, places, and things. If you are unable to cut ties with particular individuals or stay out of wet areas, you will find it challenging to keep on track. Remember, there is only one thing we need to change in recovery, everything!

If you recently completed an addiction treatment program and find yourself back in the real world diligently avoiding the trappings of drugs and alcohol, it might be time to reconsider your record collection for the foreseeable future. At least until your program of recovery is strong enough to rebel against any urges to use that might stem from listening to music. Naturally, you don’t have to cut music out for your life completely, just exercise caution when it comes to your playlist.

Recovery is a journey toward progress. We adopt specific practices and foster behaviors and traditions that will give us the power to abstain from drugs and alcohol for the rest of our lives. If you know that certain types of music or a given artist is deeply associated with your past, then it is easy enough to stay away. Perhaps you might broaden your musical horizons by giving something new a chance. There are plenty of artists who are in recovery themselves who write songs that speak to others in the program. Ask your peers what they listen to these days, you can make this task a bit of an adventure. Who knows what you might discover along the way?


Addiction Recovery

Have drugs and alcohol negatively impacted your life and well-being? At Celebrate Hope we can assist you in laying a foundation for lasting recovery. Please contact us today to begin the journey.

Friday, March 9, 2018

SAMHSA National Prevention Challenge

You cannot turn back the clock, if you have an alcohol or substance use disorder, you will contend with the disease for the rest of your life. Such a reality is a difficult thing to process at times, but it shouldn’t be a cause for malaise. Those living with mental illness can lead productive, healthy lives provided they take “certain steps” to keep the condition in remission (for lack of a better word).

If you are working a program of addiction recovery, then you know that life today is a complete 180 from your previous existence. Instead of acting selfishly in service to your disease, you act selflessly in service to your recovery. Instead of looking for ways people can benefit you, you strive to aid others in their quest for lasting change. The idea being that if you want to keep the improvements made in your life, you need to affect change in the lives of others. If you're going to keep what you have, individuals in recovery need to give it away.

There are various ways you can pay it forward in recovery. Sharing in meetings, working with a newcomer, and answering your phone when another person in the program calls are ways to give back. However, there are subtler ways that you can affect change in your small sphere of influence; as a matter of fact, how you go about your day today can inspire others to make little changes that can have a massive impact in their life.


A Healthier Tomorrow In Recovery

Early recovery is both a confusing and trying time for most people adopting a new way of living. Those in their first year of recovery have said goodbye, in many cases, to a dear and deadly friend; learning how to live without mourning the loss of drugs and alcohol isn’t an easy task. Although, while removing mind-altering substances from your life is especially beneficial, the rub lies in practicing the principles of recovery in all your affairs.

When you consider what you need to change (perceptions and behaviors), you realize that the only thing that needs to change is everything. Abstaining from drugs and alcohol is monumental, changing the way you look at things and proceed through your day in ways conducive to your health is paramount. All the pieces matter in recovery! Individuals must diligently maintain and act in ways advantageous to your mind, body, and spirit.

Once the mind becomes clear(er), and you get into the swing of daily meetings, calling your sponsor, working the steps, and so on and so forth, then please strongly consider making small adjustments to your routine. Please do not dive headfirst into making alterations talk to your sponsor beforehand; everything in its right time in recovery, always. After careful and cautious consideration, perhaps you can incorporate exercise and healthier eating into your program. Recovery significantly improves your physical and mental health, but working a program isn’t a panacea. Any auxiliary efforts made for your health can drastically improve your quality of life, i.e., exercise, mindful eating, and quitting smoking. Did you know that researchers believe smoking increase the risk of relapse?

If you can adopt new behaviors that are conducive to healthy living, doing so can and will encourage people with less time. Ask yourself, ‘what can I do today to ensure a healthier tomorrow?’


SAMHSA National Prevention Challenge

As all of us approach the ides of March, we thought it prudent to bring National Prevention Week (NPW) to your attention. The annual health observance means to increase public awareness of, and action around, substance abuse and mental health issues. See the schedule below:
  • Monday, May 14: Promotion of Mental Health & Wellness
  • Tuesday, May 15: Prevention of Underage Drinking & Alcohol Misuse
  • Wednesday, May 16: Prevention of Prescription & Opioid Drug Misuse
  • Thursday, May 17: Prevention of Illicit Drug Use & Youth Marijuana
  • Friday, May 18: Prevention of Suicide
  • Saturday, May 19: Prevention of Youth Tobacco Use
Why are we bringing NPW to your attention now, at the beginning of March? Good question! The event is brought to you by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and one of the components of NPW is the National Prevention Challenge. The organization has already begun accepting submissions for the challenge. SAMHSA wants to know:  

What would you say to your future self about what you’re doing today to ensure a healthier tomorrow? Share your answer by joining the NPW 2018 Prevention Challenge: Dear Future Me!

If you are having trouble watching, please click here.

Friday, March 2, 2018

Sharing: Giving Up Fear, Embracing Courage

Silence isn’t a luxury in addiction recovery. Years of drug and alcohol use and abuse teaches you many things, one item of instruction being what happens when you stay quiet about your struggles. Fear of opening up about your mental strife only serves to keep you in bondage. Secrecy is a symptom of your disease; as if your condition knows it will lose power over you if you open up with another person. We are, in fact, as sick as our secrets! As a result, active addiction persists long after one’s self-destructive behaviors become untenable.

All of us, in recovery or not, have fear regarding what others think of us. Even those who ardently protest their lack of concern or care for what other people think about them struggle to open the door for their peers' opinions. Humans regularly fear the truth, understanding the reasons for trepidation is not easy; we all have our reasons for taciturnity when it comes to discussing what is going on beneath the surface. It is unfortunate, that fear is a pervasive driving force in most people's lives; because if we don’t talk about our problems how can we expect ever to heal.

Recovering from any form of mental illness requires individuals to throw caution to the wind, mostly. Ironically, the longer one's active addiction persists, the easier it becomes for a person to do just that, choosing to resist fear and surrender. When a person nears the edge of spiritual annihilation, they are better able to toss aside illusions of control. When an individual realizes they are not in control of their future, they can ask for help. Pleas for help are, in most cases, audible; when there is smoke, yelling fire alerts your peers. Asking for help gets you into treatment, asking for help brings your support network to your side in recovery.


Help Surrounds You

In early recovery, you’ll learn right away the vital importance of your peers, of fellowship. Whether you are working the 12 Steps, SMART Recovery, or a faith-based modality, there is one glaring similarity; lasting recovery hinges on one’s ability to work with and rely on others for support. Nobody who works a program of recovery is perfect, and no one is ever cured; we’re all works in progress, which means that there will be days that you don’t feel like you can continue doing the next right thing. What you do in those hours of darkness can dictate the future of your program. Will you speak up and talk to your peers in a meeting or one-on-one, or will you be unforthcoming?

Recovery provides allies who can assist in overcoming any problem we are having in life. Naturally, some issues are extra-personal; it’s best to choose with care who you share such things with, probably with someone who you feel most comfortable, i.e., sponsor. You should talk about problems that you are having even if you think they are unworthy of discussing. There is an excellent chance your peers have dealt with a similar situation. Remember, there is little if anything you can say that will scare or shock an addict or alcoholics. Keep in mind the dark places most people in recovery escaped in opting for recovery.

In many cases, individuals struggle or take issue with a component of the program. Failing to see the value of something often leads people to resist doing it, a choice that can prove detrimental to one’s program. If ever you feel an aspect of recovery doesn’t suit you, rather than just opting out, why not share your feelings with the group. There are no wrong questions in recovery and your opinion matters; it’s likely that somebody else in the meeting shares your concern. When you share and ask questions, you are helping other people who may not yet have the strength to address the group.


Giving Up Fear, Embracing Courage

Again, silence isn’t a luxury you can afford in recovery. Silence keeps us from the sunshine of the spirit; it cuts us off from fellowship. Without community, no one would be long for recovery. With that in mind, do you have questions or problems that are affecting your program? If so, raise your hand or stand up at your next meeting; throw your reservations to the wind and seek guidance. Every time you share in a meeting it is an exercise in courage, speaking up makes your program stronger. It makes you more resilient to the slings and arrows of addiction, made manifest by incessant urges and cravings.

If you been thinking about drinking or drugging after abstaining for any length of time, sharing can save your recovery. It can save your life! Furthermore, if you are actively battling an alcohol or substance use disorder, picking up the phone and sharing with us what you are going through is the first step to lasting recovery. Silence is addiction; recovery is communication. At Celebrate Hope we can help you achieve your goals and heal from the insidious disease of addiction. Please contact us today.

Friday, February 23, 2018

Many Roads to Success in Recovery

Addiction is a baffling disease that steals much from its victims. If that were not bad enough, the conditions take a heavy toll on those whose loved one struggles while caught in a seemingly endless cycle of mental hardship. Few health disorders are as frustrating as alcohol and substance use disorders, mainly because friends and family find themselves powerless in helping those suffering. Even when you think you’re doing all the right things, being careful not to enable destructive behaviors and encourage changes made for the better, trouble can arise.

Things don’t always go the way you’d hope in the realm of alcohol and substance use disorder. Many parents know first-hand the feelings that come upon learning of a son or daughter's relapse. A return to drugs and alcohol is a painful occurrence for all concerned parties, especially when it happens after your child completes a treatment program. You did all the right things, and yet, the disease becomes active again. While it may seem logical to give up all hope that your adult child will find recovery, please resist the urge; relapse need not become the end of the story, countless people with long-term recovery share the common bond of a relapse in early recovery.

When all seems dark, hope is the flame that will help you guide your loved one out of the shadows and into the light of the spirit. Please don’t resign to thinking that treatment doesn’t work, and lasting recovery is a fiction; the former is an effective means of breaking the cycle and acquiring the tools for sustained progress, the latter is a reality and working a program allows people to lead a fulfilling life.


There Are Many Roads to Success in Recovery

Treatment and working a program works provided however that one is eternally vigilant in keeping the disease in remission. Problems arise when an individual becomes complacent, which is often the result of downplaying the importance of spiritual connection and fellowship. There is a salient acronym worth remembering, S.L.I.P. or Sobriety Lost Its Priority. People with a little bit of recovery time can delude themselves into thinking that life is good now, and they puzzle over why they need to “keep coming back.”

Telling yourself not to drink or drug, no matter what is helpful and all; although, it’s hardly a prophylactic for the cunning nature of one’s mental illness, alone. It’s amazing how effortlessly, and quickly a person can forget how bad it was before treatment, prior to learning that life is less complicated when you follow some simple suggestions. Individuals must never relent in recovery or lose sight of the fact that we are a work in progress; in more cliché terms, it’s the journey, not the destination that’s vital. Never will a day come when people wake up and think, ‘oh good, I’m recovered now.’ Unfortunately, the disease has a way of encouraging that line of thinking; seeds of doubt in the program’s value can quickly sprout into a relapse.

People relapse for different reasons; sometimes, chronic relapse ensues before finally grasping what is needed to stick with the program. At times, a regression is a merely a slip; it’s unfortunate, but individuals manage to get back up and address where they went off course. As long as addicts and alcoholics keep working at it, and families remain supportive even when it’s hard—such people will find the strength to carry on in recovery. There isn’t one path to lasting improvement, but there are things people can do and approaches they can take after a relapse that makes it harder to achieve one’s goals, i.e., shame, guilt, and unwarranted tough-love posturing.


Supporting Those Who Relapse

In meetings of recovery, members understand that relapse happens to even those who appear most diligent. Cunning, baffling, and powerful is the disease we’re contending with, so it’s vital for recovery fellowships to be a counterforce. Anyone who relapses is welcome back, the community’s arms are always open to those who want IT, and even for those who do not. Each person’s path is their own; we are all responsible for our inventory—nobody else's. The fellowship lends a hand whenever and wherever it can, without judgment.

At times, a relapse develops into full-blown active use; in such cases treatment might be in order. Just like a relapse, multiple stays in treatment are a part of many people’s story. It’s not uncommon to miss things the first time in a therapeutic environment. It’s critical, again, to not convince yourself that treatment didn’t work and decide that it doesn’t make sense to try again. Perhaps you might look at it a different way; it’s not that treatment didn’t work and that’s why you had a relapse; instead, the return to drugs and alcohol was the result of discontinuing practicing the things taught to you in rehab.

The next time around you or, in the case of parents, your loved one will investigate everything that precipitated your relapse. With help, people can see better that they lost sight along the way of some of the vital components of recovery. The course is then corrected, and the journey commences. Please contact Celebrate Hope to discuss treatment options.

Saturday, February 17, 2018

Addressing the Costs of Untreated Addiction

The impact of prevention and treatment of mental illness like addiction is significant, considering that both efforts save lives. People in the grips of alcohol and substance use disorders can and do recover from this deadly disease, provided however that they have assistance. Those who attempt to overcome addiction on their own, more times than not, fall short of the mark. Encouraging anyone with a mental health disorder to seek help is not just right for the individual, it’s essential for everyone.

It should go without saying that more than just the alcoholic or addict feels the impact of addiction. When individuals suffer, so too do friends and family; such people go to great lengths to help those with the disease get help. If recovery doesn’t come to fruition, there is significant emotional toil for such people. Friends and family members will also help people with addiction financially, i.e., treatment, medication, and hospitalization costs. In many cases, mothers and fathers pay bills for their sick loved one. At times such behavior is healthy, in other instances, it’s enabling; the difference between the two is often a gray area.

Most people understand that addiction treatment services are costly, saving a life can involve many addiction experts and treatment stays before recovery takes root. Lasting recovery is usually brought about by enlisting the help of outside parties; it’s difficult to avoid such costs. For most mothers and fathers there is no limit to what they would invest in the well-being of their child.

Focusing On Treatment for All

addiction treatment
Unfortunately, not every addict and alcoholic can still rely on friends and family to invest in their well-being. When that occurs, any form of help the addict or alcoholic requires comes from the state. Nary an American is unfamiliar with the havoc wrought by opioid addiction, with around a hundred people dying of overdose each day. Emergency services spare substantially more people from premature death, i.e., first responders, emergency room visits, and state and local mental health services. As you can probably imagine, much of the epidemic's financial toll stems from emergency hospitalization.

Altarum, a nonprofit group that studies the health economy, analyzed CDC mortality data through June of last year, NPR reports. The organization's assessment indicates the cost of the opioid epidemic, from 2001 to 2017, is upwards of $1 trillion. Emergency room visits, ambulance costs, and the use of naloxone accounts for hundreds of billions of dollars.

Much of the financial toll stems from work productivity and tax losses, given that young people in the grips of addiction are unable to hold down employment. Of course, the significant mortality rate from opioid use has drained the American workforce as well. If things do not change, researchers predict that in the next three years the epidemic will cost at least another $500 billion. The cost growth is occurring at an exponential rate; avoiding such increases will depend mainly on investing in addiction treatment services. The Altarum researchers say we need a “comprehensive and sustained national response.”

Opioid Use Disorder Treatment

When people go to treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders, they have the best chance of achieving long-term recovery. Any delays in seeking help can lead to disastrous consequences; please contact Celebrate Hope at Hope by The Sea to begin the life-saving journey of recovery.

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Service Commitments for Recovery

It feels good to be there for others when called upon for help. Being of service to others is an excellent way to get out of your head, a place that is at times dangerous to linger in—especially in recovery. Few people who are actively using drugs and alcohol can perform selfless acts; addiction demands too much from the individual to expel any energy on others. Conversely, recovery affords ample opportunity to resend selfish and self-centered behavior, allowing one to dedicate themselves to assisting others in times of need.

Many of our readers are in early recovery which means that they are still figuring some things out regarding working a program and this is not by accident; Celebrate Hope is committed to introducing men and women to recovery. We serve as guides when rehabilitation is in its infancy. Our desire to help doesn’t cease when a client passes to the other side of our recovery safety threshold. We hope to provide sound advice for navigating recovery long after treatment comes to a close.

The majority of our former clients now subscribe to the tenets of the 12 Steps and strive to practice the principles of recovery in all their affairs. Such people endeavor to make progress, but are not always perfect, which is more than OK provided however that they adjust their program when necessary. Once you get into the swing of recovery—going to meetings, working with a sponsor, and such— it becomes easy to see that the enterprise of restoration rests on helping others. In early recovery, one is inclined to think that help is a one-sided affair. However, it is difficult to see how you might be aiding others in their recovery. Rest assured, you are doing more for your fellows than you realize.


A Fellow of Recovery

We all have a natural desire to form an understanding of our role in any system or organization, a fellowship is no different. In time, you form strong bonds with other people in your support network, people you can turn to when times are hard, or your recovery is in jeopardy. Some of you haven’t had the privilege, yet, of walking somebody with less Time than you through the steps. A fact that might lead you to believe that you are taking more from the program than you’re giving back. The truth is altogether different.

Each time you share your story or current difficulty at a meeting you are helping your fellows in recovery. Even those who are new that share rarely, if at all, are doing the group a service; the mere act of being a presence in a meeting on a regular basis is empowering for your peers. Merely showing up to daily meetings inspires people with less time than you to keep coming back. Rarely sharing is not prohibited in recovery, but keep in mind that the more you share, the more likely you are to receive constructive feedback applicable to your recovery.

It is also worth noting that sponsorship is not the only way to give back to the program. At every meeting across the country and beyond, exists service commitments. Chores in a sense, but ones with a priceless reward; as with any exercise in selflessness, you get back far more than you put in. Showing up early to a meeting for set-up or breaking down after meetings; making coffee or supplying snacks for the group, are all commitments you can volunteer for in early recovery. When you act in service to the group, a power Greater than yourself in effect, you’re helping yourself and others as well. Service commitments are perfect opportunities to practice the principles of recovery.


Together, We Stay Sober

The next time the option to help a fellow in recovery or your “homegroup” arises, please accept the honor. In doing so, you learn a valuable lesson, when others trust you it's a sign of progress and feels terrific being trusted by your peers; a feeling that doesn’t exist in active addiction. When you fulfill your commitments, you learn the value of accountability, which is vital.

If you are struggling with drugs and alcohol and would like to begin a life-changing journey of recovery, please contact Celebrate Hope at Hope by the Sea. We can answer any questions you might have, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Friday, February 2, 2018

Overcoming Fear, Seeking Addiction Treatment

addiction recovery
Talking about what’s going on inside you isn’t an easy job, especially if you are struggling with mental illness. Fear is one of the most significant barriers to addiction recovery—even when you need help the most feeling paralyzed is a common occurrence. Regardless of how your disease manifests itself, i.e., one is predisposed to have reservations about discussing it with peers. Sadly, we all worry too much about what others think about mental health problems; it’s the byproduct of hundreds of years of stigma. Overcoming the worries we have about what people think of us is vital to seeking help; failing to do so can be deadly.

Please take a moment to consider how many people around the globe struggle with untreated mental health conditions, you might find it paradoxical that such people continue to eschew treatment. After all, over 300 million people battle depression each year, worldwide. Millions and millions of others struggle with anxiety, bipolar disorder, and alcohol and substance use disorder. In the United States, more than 2 million American meet the criteria for opioid use disorder, over a half million have a heroin use disorder. An even higher number of people are addicted to alcohol, and untreated alcoholism is one of the leading causes of illness worldwide.

With so many people who have a mental illness, you may find it troubling that mustering the courage to seek help is such a monumental task. Both people in recovery and in need of treatment make up a vast demographic; by joining together, we can end the stigma that prevents addiction recovery.


Addiction Recovery Works

Far more people are in active addiction than active recovery; a fact that may lead many individuals to think that recovery is a fluke. The reality is that anyone who openly and honestly works a program of healing can achieve lasting recovery. The likelihood of your recovery cannot rest on statistics or the mindset of those that addiction has passed over. Your recovery begins with a decision to try a different way of life, a polar opposite way of thinking. The first manifestation of that is surrender; admitting to yourself and another person that your way of living is no longer tenable.

Overcoming active addiction and taking steps for recovery usually involves talking to a friend or family member about seeking help. It’s likely that there is at least one person in your life who will not pass judgment about your struggles; a person who will encourage you to seek assistance and support you along the way. We realize that many people in late stage addiction have burned most of their bridges with family and friends. Perhaps you are one of those people, do not be discouraged; there exists a fellowship of people who want to see you get better, even if they have never met you. And their support is usually just a phone call away.

Those working in the field of addiction medicine and treatment are acutely familiar with what keeps people from asking for support. Many of those same people are in addiction recovery them self; meaning, they too struggled to reach out for help before they finally surrendered. Reaching out to an alcohol and substance use disorder treatment center can be your first step to ending the cycle of self-defeating behavior and a sign that fear will no longer drive you.

Remember your dreams and fight for them. You must know what you want from life. There is just one thing that makes your dream become impossible: the fear of failure. —Paulo Coelho—


Addiction Recovery

Celebrate Hope at Hope by The Sea can help you discover the journey of lasting recovery. We are here for you 24hrs a day to discuss your options for embarking on a new way of life. Please contact us at your earliest convenience; we would love to be a part of your addiction recovery.
CignaAetnaBlueCross BlueShieldUnited HealthcareMore Options/Verify Benefits

Connect With Our Campus Pastor

Our Christian counselors and campus Pastor walk with clients in their journey of recovery and reconnection to God.

Request a Call From Us